Natives Speakers Avoid Using ぬ Instead of くなる

natives-often-avoid-using-shinu-die-instead-nakuranu-pass-way-learn-japanese-online-how-to-speak-japanese-language-for-beginners-basic-study-in-japan

Natives Speakers Avoid Using ぬ Instead of くなる

If you express “___ die”, you might use “___がぬ”, however, which is so direct word for native speakers and one of them may feel uncomfortable if you use “ぬ”, instead of “くなる”, although using “ぬ” is not wrong. So, let me introduce what the situations of using “ぬ” are proper and what “くなる” means today!




Die

ぬ” means “die” and the verb, however using “die” is a straight expression as well as English. Talking to your close friends e.g “___ died. (〇〇さんはにました)” is fine, but don’t use it to your boss and public situations. It would be a bad impression and childish expression.

Example
ゆか
このおじいさんはトラックにはねられたあとんだみたい。 (I’ve heard this man died after being hit by a track.) (这位爷爷似乎在被卡车撞倒后死亡。) (이 할아버지, 트럭에 치인 후에 죽었대.) (Hình như ông cụ này đã chết sau khi bị một chiếc xe tải đâm.)
たつや
ここ10年間じゅうねんかんくらい、おおくの高齢者こうれいしゃ病院内びょういんないんでいます。 (In the past 10 years or so, many elderly people die in the hospital.) (在过去十年间,许多高龄老人在医院内死亡。) (최근 10년 동안, 많은 고령자가 병원에서 죽었습니다.) (Trong mười năm qua có nhiều người cao tuổi chết trong bệnh viện.)
ゆか
友達ともだちいもうと2年前にねんまえんだよ。 (My friend’s sister died 2 years ago.) (两年前,我朋友的妹妹去世了。) (친구 여동생은 2년 전에 죽었어.) (Em gái của bạn tôi đã chết cách đây hai năm.)

くなる

Pass away

くなる” means “pass away” and this is what a common word is in Japanese as well. You could use it in all of the situations in both casual and business situations. And even if you use “くなる” to your boss and in public situations, it would not be a bad impression rather better.

Example
たつや
おじさんがくなったいて残念ざんねんです。 (I’m sorry to hear your uncle passed away.) (我很遗憾听到叔叔去世了。) (삼촌이 돌아가셨다는 얘길 들었는데, 유감입니다.) (Tôi rất tiếc khi nghe tin bác ấy mất.)
ゆか
友達ともだち昨年さくねん2月にがつくなったんだ。 (My friend passed away last February.) (我的朋友居然在去年2月过世了。) (작년 2월에 친구가 죽었어.) (Bạn tôi đã qua đời hồi tháng Hai năm ngoái.)
たつや
祖母そぼ交通事故こうつうじこまれてくなりました。 (My grandma has passed away, who was involved in a car accident.) (我的祖母死于交通事故。) (할머니는 교통사고에 연루되어 돌아가셨어요.) (Bà tôi qua đời vì bị vướng vào một tai nạn giao thông.)




うしなう / くす

Lose someone

うしなう” means “lose someone” which is used for especially “a car accident” or “die of one of the illness”. This expression is not too straight such as “ぬ(die)” and it can be used to your boss and in public situations as well.

Example
ゆか
おじいちゃんを交通事故こうつうじこうしなたよ。 (I lost my grandpa in a car accident.) (我在一次交通事故中失去了我的爷爷。) (할아버지는 교통사고로 돌아가셨어.) (Tớ đã mất ông nội trong một tai nạn giao thông.)
LISTENING COURSE Sample  
Beginner
Intermediate
Advanced
 
listening-course-baner-learn-japanese-online-how-to-speak-japanese-language-for-beginners-basic-study-in-japan
たつや
レンは友達ともだちをアルコール中毒ちゅうどくうしなったらしいよ。 (I’ve heard Ren lost a friend to alcohol addiction.) (Ren的好友好像是死于酗酒。) (렌은 친구를 알콜 중독으로 잃었대.) (Ren hình như đã đánh mất bạn bè vì chứng nghiện rượu.)
ゆか
友達ともだちが、父親ちちおやをがんでくしたみたいだね。 (I’ve heard my friend lost her father to cancer.) (我好友的父亲貌似是因为癌症去世。) (친구 아버지는 암으로 돌아가신 것 같아.) (Nghe nói bạn tôi đã mất cha vì căn bệnh ung thư.)

Gone

く” means “gone” and these are a figurative expression. The way to use is the same as “dead” however, using it is not straight than using “dead”. Although you can say “く” in daily conversation, basically it is used as a written word.

Example
たつや
悪役あくやくはもうそうだね。 (The villain looks like he’s about to be gone.) (反派已经快要死了。) (악역은 곧 저세상에 갈 것 같다.) (Nhân vật phản diện sắp tiêu rồi.)
ゆか
友達ともだち祖父母そふぼは、2人ふたりともすでにったよ。 (Both of my friend’s grandparents are gone.) (我朋友的祖父母都已经过世了。) (친구의 할머니와 할아버지는 두 분 모두 이미 돌아가셨어.) (Cả hai ông bà của bạn tôi đều đã qua đời.)
たつや
大好だいすききだった歌手かしゅってしまった。 (A singer I loved was gone.) (我爱的歌手去世了。) (많이 좋아했던 가수가 하늘나라에 갔다.) (Ca sĩ mà tôi yêu thích đã qua đời mất rồi.)

2 Quick Tips About いただきます and ごちそうさま

2018.05.18

6 Best Ways to Apologize For Beginners

2018.05.15

No More Mistakes About Using Both こわい and こわ

2018.05.12

The Best Advice The Way To Use こっそり, こそこそ and ひっそり

2018.05.09
Japanese-listening-course--baner-man2 Japanese-listening-course--baner-woman




Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *