200+ Basic Japanese Phrases Beginners Must-Know

200+ Basic Japanese Phrases Beginners Must-Know
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200+ Basic Japanese Phrases

Do you want to know a lot of Japanese Phrases?

Then read here! After remembering them, I’m sure your Japanese will turn like native Japanese speakers!

Let’s go!

You made it!:よくくれたね!(yoku kite kureta ne)

When you want to describe “your joy with this phrase which a person who came all the way or you think a person won’t be able to visit you but he/she came”, you would be able to use “よくてくれたね!(yoku kite kureta ne)” which means “You made it!”.

Learn more: yoku kitekureta ne

tatsuya

ゆか!よくてくれたね!日本にほんへようこそ。 (Yuka! You made it! Welcome to Japan.) (Yuka! yoku kite kureta ne! Nihon e yōkoso.)

What a waste of time!:時間じかんがもったいないよ!(jikan ga mottai nai yo)

When you feel the time is waisting, you would be able to use “時間じかんがもったいないよ!(jikan ga mottainai yo)” which means “What a waste of time!”.

Learn more: jikan ga mottainai yo

yuka

時間じかんがもったいないよ。 (What a waste of time!) (jikan ga mottai nai yo.)

Awesome!:すごい!(sugoi)

When you are surprised at someone or something who and which is special, you would be able to use “すごい!(sugoi)” which means “Awesome!”.

Learn more: sugoi

tatsuya

てないよ!どうすごいの? (I haven’t seen it yet. What’s so awesome about it?) (mite nai yo! dō sugoi no?)

Have no class!:下品げひん!(gehin)

When you want to describe “person is crass, rude, or acting outside the boundaries of the lowest socially acceptable behavior”, you would be able to use “下品げひん!(gehin)” which means “Have no class!”.

Learn more: gehin

yuka

下品げひんだって! (You have no class, huh?) (gehin datte!)

Excuse me!:すみません!(sumimasen)

When you want to politely get someone’s attention, especially when you are about to ask them a question, you would be able to use “すみません!(sumimasen)” which means “Excuse me!”.

Learn more: sumimasen

tatsuya

すみません! (Excuse me!) (sumimasen!)

It means a lot!:とってもうれしい!(tottemo ureshī)

When you say “thank you to the person who helped or gave him/her something”, you would be able to use “とってもうれしい!(tottemo ureshī) ” which means “It means a lot!”.

Learn more: tottemo ureshī

yuka

すごくってる!とってもうれしい。 (I love it! It means a lot to me.) (sugoku kinītteru! tottemo ureshī.)

I’m sick of ___!:___にうんざり!(ni unzari

When you want to describe “to express that you are tired of something; to express you don’t like something any more”, you would be able to use “___にうんざり!(ni unzari)” which means “I’m sick of ___!”.

Learn more: ni unzari

yuka

ひとごみにうんざりだよー。 (I was sick of the crowd.) (hitogomi ni unzarida yo-.)

It’s pouring!:どしゃり!(doshaburi)

When you want to describe “to rain heavily without stopping”, you would be able to use “どしゃり!(doshaburi)” which means “It’s pouring!”.

Learn more: doshaburi

yuka

明日あしたはどしゃりみたいだよ。 (I’ve heard there will be pouring tomorrow.) (ashita wa doshaburi mitai dayo.)

Better than nothing!:いよりはマシ!(naiyori wa mashi)

When you want to describe “something is not what is required, but that it is better to have that thing than to have nothing at all”, you would be able to use “いよりはマシ!(naiyori wa mashi)” which means “Better than nothing!”.

Learn more: naiyori wa mashi

tatsuya

いよりはマシじゃない? (Better than nothing, right?) (nai yori wa mashi janai?)

It’s not that __.:___というわけではない。(to iuwake dewa nai)

When you want to describe “although you can do something, somewhat you don’t want to do about it.”, you would be able to use “___というわけではない。(to iuwake dewa nai)” which means “It’s not that ___ / It doesn’t mean that ___”.

Learn more: to iuwake dewa nai

yuka

なかいっぱいっていうわけじゃないけど、なんかちょっと体調悪たいちょうわるい。 (It’s not that I’m not full, but I’m not feeling very well.) (onaka ippai tte iu wake janai kedo, nanka chotto taichō warui.)

Flaming!:炎上えんじょうする。(enjou suru)

When you want to describe “the act of posting or sending offensive messages over the Internet”, you would be able to use “炎上えんじょうする。(enjou suru)” which means “Flaming!”.

Learn more: enjou suru

yuka

炎上えんじょうしたブログ! (The blog got flamed!) (enjō shita burogu!)

Don’t drink and drive!:んだら運転うんてんしちゃダメだよ!(nondara unten shicha dame dayo)

When you don’t want someone to drive after drinking, you would be able to use “んだら運転うんてんしちゃダメだよ!(nondara unten shicha dame dayo)” which means “Don’t drink and drive!”.

Learn more: enjou suru

tatsuya

んだら運転うんてんしちゃダメだよ! (Don’t drink and drive!) (nondara unten shicha dame dayo!)

Rain bringer:雨女あめおんな雨男あめおとこ。(ame onna / ame otoko)

When you want to describe “a friend who always brings the rain in events such as travel”, you would be able to use “雨女あめおんな雨男あめおとこ(ame onna / ame otoko)” which means “Rain bringer”.

Learn more: ame onna / ame otoko

yuka

雨男あめおとこじゃない? (You’re a rain bringer, aren’t you?) (ame otoko janai?)

You Rock!:最高さいこう!(saikou)

When you want to describe “people or things that are super great”, you would be able to use “最高さいこう!(saikou)” which means “You rock!”.

Learn more: saikou

tatsuya

最高さいこうだよ! (You rock!) (saikō dayo!)

Just saying!:ちょっとってみただけだよ!(chotto itte mita dake dayo)

When you are making a criticism or complaint, to make it less likely to offend someone”, you would be able to use “ちょっとってみただけだよ!(chotto itte mita dake dayo)” which means “Just saying!”.

Learn more: chotto itte mita dake dayo

yuka

ちょっとってみただけだよ!くさ (Just saying! haha) (chotto itte mita dake dayo! kusa)

Abs!:腹筋ふっきん!(fukkin)

腹筋ふっきん(fukkin)” is “Abs” which both boys and girls like. A guy who has great abs is popular with girls in Japan as well. Do you like the guy who has great abs?

Learn more: fukkin

tatsuya

最近さいきん腹筋ふっきんしてるんだー。 (I’ve been doing sit-ups lately.) (saikin fukkin shi teru nda-.)

What a pain!:めんどくさい!(mendo kusai)

When you think “What a pain!” about something, you would “めんどくさい!”. Furthermore, “___するのがめんどくさい(mendo kusai)” is “I can’t be bothered to ___.” such as “勉強べんきょうするのがめんどくさい” is “I can’t be bothered to study.”

Learn more: mendokusai

yuka

あー、めんどくさい! (Ahhh! What a pain!) (a-, mendo kusai!)

Living the life!:リアじゅう!(ria juu)

A person who is living the life such as traveling a lot, getting a new boyfriend or girlfriend, having fun every day, etc who are called “リアじゅう(ria juu)” which is one of the slang used by the younger generation.

Learn more: ria juu

tatsuya

リアじゅうだね! (It seems like you’re living the life!) (riajū dane!)

You’re exaggerating!:おおげさでしょ!(oogesa desho)

When you feel someone said as being larger, greater, better, or worse than it really is, you would say “おおげさでしょ!(oogesa desho)” which means “You’re exaggerating!” and “おおげさじゃない?” is often used that is “You’re exaggerating, huh?”.

Learn more: oogesa desho

yuka

おおげさでしょ!!くさ (You’re exaggerating! haha) (ōgesa desho! ! kusa)

You freak me out!:ああびっくりした!(aa bikkuri shita)

When you are surprised at something, you would say “ああびっくりした!(aa bikkuri shita)” which means “You freak me out!” that native speakers are really surprised at something, they would be saying “ああびっくりした!” than “おどろいた”.

Learn more: dayone

tatsuya

ああびっくりした! (You freak me out!) (ā bikkuri shita!)

Of course, I will.:もちろん、そうするよ!(mochiron sou suru yo)

When being asked something by someone and you want to do what he/she said, you would use “Of course, I will.”

Learn more: mochiron sou suru yo

yuka

もちろん,そうするよ。 (Of course, I will.) (mochiron, sō suru yo.)

IKR:だよねー!(dayone)

“だよねー(dayone)” is one of the “back-channeling(Uh-huh, I see, Right, Really?, Great! etc)” and which the younger generation usually uses. When you agree with what your friends said, you would use this.

Learn more: dayone

tatsuya

だよねー! (I know, right?) (dayone-!)

Such a dog!:チャラいよ!(charai)

“チャラい(charai)” is used for a guy when he behaves cheeky or says something naughty. Not really bad, just kind of low, kind of cheap, rough or naughty. You can also say it to someone who played a joke on you or made fun of you.

Learn more: charai

yuka

チャラいよ! (You’re such a dog!) (charai yo!)

I love it!:大好だいすき!(dai suki)

When you love something such as food, movies, show-biz, books, design and even your partner(I love you), you would use this. For your information, “き(suki)” is “I like it!”

Learn more: daisuki

tatsuya

大好だいすきだよ! (I love it!) (daisuki dayo!)

I am irritated!:イライラする!(iraira suru)

When you got irritated by something or someone, you would say this. “Don’t get irritated.” is “イライラしないで!(iraira shinai de)” and which you would say for your friends, teachers, colleagues, etc when you saw them getting irritated.

Learn more: iraira suru

yuka

今日きょうはイライラする! (I’m irritated today!) (kyō wa iraira suru!)

How can I say __ in Japanese?:___wa nihongo de nante ittara ī desu ka?

Discover a new phrase each day to use in your Japanese! What does the expression “___は日本語にほんごなんったらいいですか?(___wa nihongo de nante ittara ī desu ka)” mean? Visit daily to learn some popular Japanese phrases on a regular basis!

Learn more: ___wa nihongo de nante ittara ī desu ka?

tatsuya

“Water”日本語にほんごなんったらいいですか? (How can I say “Water” in Japanese?) (Waterwa nihongo de nante ittara ī desu ka?)

What time it is?:“ima nanji desuka?”

Discover a new phrase each day to use in your Japanese! What does the expression “今何時いまなんじですか?(ima nanji desuka)” mean? Visit daily to learn some popular Japanese phrases on a regular basis!

Learn more: ima nanji desuka?

yuka

今何時いまなんじですか? (What time it is?) (ima nanji desu ka?)

I skinned my knee!:“hiza surimui chatta!”

Discover a new phrase each day to use in your Japanese! What does the expression “ひざりむいちゃった!(hiza surimui chatta)” mean? Visit daily to learn some popular Japanese phrases on a regular basis!

Learn more: hiza surimui chatta!

yuka

いたっ!ヒザりむいちゃった。 (Ouch! I skinned my knee.) (ita! hiza surimui chatta.)

I’ll die without an air conditioner!:“eakon nashi nante muri!”

When it’s so hot outside, I’d say you would turn on the AC and you would say “エアコンなしなんてムリ!(eakon nashi nante muri)” which is one of the explorations that you want to say it’s so hot outside.

Learn more: eakon nashi nante muri

tatsuya

エアコンなしなんてムリだわー! (I’ll die without an air conditioner!) (eakon’nashi nante murida wa-!)

Just suck it up!:“guchagucha iuna!”

When someone complains a lot, you would say “ぐちゃぐちゃうな!(guchagucha iuna)” which means “Just suck it up!”, however, this is really boyish, if you are a girl/woman, “ぐちゃぐちゃわないでよ!(guchagucha iwa nai de yo)” would sound natural but guys won’t be able to use.

Learn more: guchagucha iuna!

yuka

ぐちゃぐちゃわないでよ! (Just suck it up!) (guchagucha iwa nai de yo!)

I don’t give a fuck!:”shiru ka boke!

When you’ve absolutely had it with someone’s bullshit and seriously couldn’t care any less about what they do, you would use “るかボケ!(shiru ka boke!)”. The phrase is not to be used in a public environment unless you truly “Don’t give a fuck”. This word for boys/men and if you are a girl/woman, you would “勝手かってにして!(katte ni shite!)” or “どうでもいいよ!(dotchi demo ī yo!)” which means “I don’t care!”

Learn more: shiru ka boke!

tatsuya

るかボケ (I don’t give a fuck!) (shiru ka boke!)

Adorable!:”kawaī!

If you are a girl/woman, you may often use the word “かわいい!(kawaī)” for people or animals or even things that are easy to love because they are very attractive and you feel great affection for them. Japanese girls really love the word “かわいい!” in daily conversation.

Learn more: kawaī!

yuka

かわいい (Adorable!) (kawaī!)

I have a hangover!:”futsuka yoi dayo

When you have a hangover, you would say “二日酔ふつかよいだよ!(futsuka yoi dayo)” and which means “a feeling of illness the next day after drinking too much alcohol”. When you say to your boss about it, “二日酔ふつかよいです。(futsuka yoi desu)”.

Learn more: futsuka yoi dayo

tatsuya

二日酔ふつかよ (I have a hangover!) (¡Tengo una resaca!) (futsuka yoi.)

I’m looking forward to it!:”tanoshimi ni shiteru ne

When you are excited and pleased about something that is going to happen, you would say “たのしみにしてるね!(tanoshimi ni shiteru ne)” which is for girls or women so if you are boys or men, you would say “たのしみにしてるよ!(tanoshimi ni shiteru yo)” or “たのしみにしてるわ!(tanoshimi ni shiteru wa)”. When putting something before “たのしみにしてる”, you would be able to explain what you are looking forward such as “えるのをたのしみにしてるね!” means “I’m looking forward to seeing you tomorrow.”

Learn more: tanoshimi ni shiteru ne

yuka

たのしみにしてるね (I’m looking forward to it!) (tanoshimi ni shi teru ne!)

This is very light and tasty!:“sappari shiteite oishī!”

After eating something and which taste is light and tasty, you would say “さっぱりしていて美味おいしい!(sappari shiteite oishī)”. If you want to say only “This is very light!”, you would say “さっぱりしてるね!(sappari shiteru ne!)”.

Learn more: sappari shiteite oishī!

tatsuya

さっぱりしていて美味おいしい! (This is very light and tasty!) (sappari shite ite oishī!)

Don’t overdo it!:”muri shinai dene!

When a person who overdo something such as working and studying so hard, you would say “無理むりしないでね!(muri shinai dene)” to him/her which is one of the words of consideration.

Learn more: muri shinai dene!

yuka

無理むりしないでね (Don’t overdo it.) (muri shinai dene!)

You pervert!:“hentai!”

When your friends, especially boys tell jokes to you girls, you would say “変態へんたい(hentai)!” while laughing. However, if you feel bad about what they said, you should say this with a serious look. Boys or men would be able to also use this to girls though.

Learn more: hentai

tatsuya

変態へんたいじゃね?わら (You pervert! haha) (hentai jane? wara)

You crack me up!:chō ukeru!”

When your friends made you laugh so much, you would say “ちょうウケる!(chō ukeru)”. “とても面白おもしろいです(You are so funny.)(totemo omoshiroi desu)” is not bad, however, among your friends, “ちょうウケる!” sound more friendly than it.

Learn more: chō ukeru

yuka

ちょうウケるくさ (You crack me up!) (chō ukeru! kusa)

I was pickpocketed!:suri ni ai mashita!”

When you were pickpocketed, you would say “スリにあいました!(suri ni ai mashita)”. And “スリ(suri)” is a noun which means “pickpocket”. Be careful about “スリ”.

Learn more: suri ni ai mashita

tatsuya

スリにあったんだ。 (I was pickpocketed.) (suri ni atta nda.)

That’s stupid!:kudaranai!”

When you feel something is stupid, you would say “くだらない!(kudaranai)”. Sayin only “くだらない!” is too strong, so you might want to say “くだらないよ!(kudaranai yo)”, “くだらないね!(kudaranai ne)” and “くだらねぇ!(only for men)(kudara ne-)” that is the pretty negative meaning. However, if you laugh at what someone said in saying it, that would be a positive meaning, even if it is stupid.

Learn more: kudaranai

yuka

くだらないよ。 (That’s stupid!) (kudaranai yo.)

Where is the bathroom?:“toire wa doko desuka?”

Although you have to go to the bathroom, you don’ know where the bathroom/toilet is, in that case, you would say “トイレはどこですか?(toire wa doko desuka)” which means “Where is the bathroom/toilet?”. Before asking it, you would say “すいません” means “Excuse me”. So, “すいません、トイレはどこですか?” that you would use to ask where the bathroom/toilet is.

Learn more: toire wa doko desuka?

tatsuya

すいません、トイレはどこですか? (Excuse me, where is the bathroom/toilet?) (suimasen, toire wa dokodesu ka?)

Popular with girls/boys!:“moteru!”

When he/she is popular with girls/boys, you would say “かれ/彼女かのじょはモテる!(He/She is popular with girls/boys!)” and “わたしはモテる!(I am popular with girl/boys!)”, “あなたはモテる!(You are popular with girl/boys!)” which you would be able to say. Furthermore, “モテるでしょ?” means “You are popular with girls/boys, huh?”

Learn more: moteru

yuka

モテるでしょ? (You’re popular with girls, huh?) (moteru desho?)

Are you free to talk now?:“ima hanasu jikan aru?”

When you want to talk to someone now, you would be able to use this phrase “いまはな時間じかんある?(ima hanasu jikan aru)” means “Are you free to talk now?”. If you want to him/her tomorrow, that would be “明日あしたはな時間じかんある?(ashita hanasu jikan aru)”.

Learn more: ima hanasu jikan aru?

tatsuya

いまはな時間じかんある? (Are you free to talk now?) (ima, hanasu jikan aru?)

Have a heart!:“ōme ni mite yo!”

When asking someone to be kinder to you, him or her, you would say “大目おおめてよ!(ōme ni mite yo)” means “Have a heart!”. If you say that, your friends, your parents, etc might forgive you doing wrong.

Learn more: ōme ni mite yo!

yuka

大目おおめてあげてよ! (Have a heart!) (ōme ni mite agete yo!)

Bar/Pub crawl!:“hashigo suru!”

“はしごする!(hashigo suru)” means “A bar/pub crawl is the act of drinking in multiple pubs or bars in a single night” which is “Bar or Pub crawl!”. “はしご(hashigo)” is a noun and “はしごする(hashigo suru)” is a verb.

Learn more: hashigo suru!

tatsuya

今夜こんやはしごだね!わら (Let’s bar crawl tonight.) (kon’ya wa hashigo dane! wara)

What was that?:nante

When you couldn’t clearly hear what someone said, you would use “なんて?(nante)” means “What was that?” which is so casual. So without friends, you might want to use “なんいましたか?(nanto īmashita ka)” means “Perdon?” that would be better.

Learn more: nante

yuka

えっ、なんて? (What? What was that?) (e, nante?)

Oh well!:shōganai!

“しょうがない!(shōganai)” means “Oh well!” and which has been used for accepting a bad situation or disappointment. Even though you or they are not very happy about it, you accept a situation or that someone else should accept it.

Learn more: shōganai!

tatsuya

しょうがないよ!一緒いっしょ練習れんしゅうしようよ! (Oh well. I guess we’ll wait. Let’s practice Japanese together!) (shōganai yo! issho ni renshū shiyou yo!)

I saw a shooting star!:“nagareboshi wo mita yo!”

When you saw a shooting star, you might want to say about it to someone. That phrase is “ながぼしたよ!(nagareboshi wo mita yo!)”. “ながぼし(nagareboshi)” means “a shooting star”. Did you make a wish after seeing it?

Learn more: nagareboshi wo mita yo!

yuka

昨日きのうながぼしたの! (Yesterday, I saw a shooting star!) (kinō, nagare boshi wo mita no!)

Come to think of it___:sō ieba___

When you have suddenly remembered about a subject that you are talking about, you would use “そういえば___(sō ieba)” means “Come to think of it”. “そういえば___” is often used with “あっ!(a)” which word sounds you suddenly remembered about something. For instance, “あっ、そういえば___(a, sō ieba)”.

Learn more: sō ieba___

tatsuya

わかんない。あっ、そういえば宿題しゅくだいするの忘わすれてた! (I can’t. Come to think of it, I forgot to do my homework!) (wakan’nai. a, sō ieba shukudai suru no wasureteta!)

What are you getting at?:nani ga ītai no

When you feel someone express, suggest, or show something without stating it directly, you would say “なにいたいの?(nani ga ītai no)” means “What are you getting at?”. When you want to know something from someone, then you would use this!

Learn more: nani ga ītai no

yuka

なにいたいの? (What are you getting at? (nani ga ītai no?)

Relax!:ochitsukina yo!

When a person got upset or angry at something or someone, you would say “きなよ!(ochitsukina yo)” means “Relax!”. After you say this, your friends, your parents, etc, might be relaxed. “きなよ!(ochitsukina yo)” is also “Calm down!”.

Learn more: ochitsukina yo!

tatsuya

けよー (Relax, man!) (ochitsuke yo-!)

Take it easy!:“muri shinaide ne!”

When a person who works too hard, you would say “無理むりしないでね!(muri shinaide ne)” to him/her for being relaxing which means “Take it easy!”. You can also use “無理むりしないでください!(muri shinaide kudasai)” as formal.

Learn more: muri shinaide ne!

yuka

無理むりしないでね! (Take it easy!) (muri shinaide ne!)

Cocky!:“nama iki!”

When you see a person who is so confident in a way that is unpleasant and sometimes rude, you would say “生意気なまいき!(nama iki)” and the way to use it is “かれ生意気なまいき(He’s cocky!) (kare wa nama iki)”, “生意気なまいき!(You’re cocky!)” and so on.

Learn more: nama iki!

tatsuya

生意気なまいきだなー!何才なんさい (He’s cocky! How old is he?) (nama iki dana-! nan sai?)

Make sure!:kakunin suru

When you want to check something so that you can be sure about something, you would use “確認かくにんする(kakunin suru)” or “たしかめる(tashikameru)” means “make sure”.

Learn more: kakunin suru

yuka

わすものないか確認かくにんして (Make sure we haven’t forgotten anything.) (wasure mono nai ka kakunin shite!)

That’s not the point!:“sō iu mondai ja nai!”

When a person who is talking about something which is not relevant to the question you were discussing, you would be able to say “そういう問題もんだいじゃない!(sō iu mondai ja nai)” means “That’s not the point!”

Learn more: sō iu mondai ja nai!

tatsuya

そういう問題もんだいじゃないんだよ! (That’s not the point!) (sō iu mondai janai nda yo!)

You’re speaking my language!:“ī koto iu jan!”

When you completely agree with what someone just said, you would be able to use “いいことうじゃん!(ī koto iu jan)” means “You’re speaking my language!”. Or you can also say “いいことうね!(ī koto iu ne)” which sounds a little bit soft than “いいことうじゃん!”.

Learn more: ī koto iu jan!

yuka

いいことうじゃん! (Now, You’re speaking my language! (ī koto iu jan!)

You sound very excited!:“sugoku ureshi sō dane!”

What someone said sounds so happy or excited, you would be able to “すごくうれしそうだね!(sugoku ureshi sō dane)” means “You sound very excited!”. The negative form of “すごくうれしそうだね!” would be “あんまりうしそうじゃないね!(anmari ushi sō janai ne)”.

Learn more: sugoku ureshi sō dane!

tatsuya

すごくうれしそうだね! (You sound very excited!) (sugoku ureshi sō dane!)

No way!:“zettai iya!”

When you will definitely not do something or that something will definitely not happen, you would be able to use “絶対嫌ぜったいいや(zettai iya)” or “絶対無理ぜったいむり(zettai muri)“. “絶対嫌ぜったいいや” sounds a little bit stronger than “絶対無理ぜったいむり“.

Learn more: zettai iya!

yuka

絶対無理ぜったいむり彼女かのじょいるじゃん! (No way! You do have your girlfriend!) (zettai muri! kanoji iru jan!)

You look mature for your age!:“otona ppoi ne!”

When you feel someone doesn’t look like his/her age, you would be able to use “大人おとなっぽいね!(otona ppoi ne)” means “You look mature for your age!” that is basically a positive meaning.

Learn more: otona ppoi ne!

tatsuya

大人おとなっぽいね!いいじゃん! (You look mature for your age! I like it!) (otona ppoi ne! ī jan!)

It’s been a long time!:hisashi buri!

When you met a person who you know and it’s quite a long time, you would be able to say “ひさしぶり!(hisashi buri)” means “It’s been a long time!”

Learn more: hisashi buri!

yuka

ひさしぶり (It’s been a long time!) (hisashi buri!)

I get drunk easily!:“osake ni yowai desu!”

When you easily get drunk, you would be able to say “おさけよわいです!(osake ni yowai desu)” means “I get drunk easily!”. An interrogative sentence of it is “おさけよわいですか?(Do you get drunk easily?) (osake ni yowai desu ka?)”.

Learn more: osake ni yowai desu!

tatsuya

さけよわいんだ。わら (I get drunk easily! haha) (sake ni yowai nda. wara)

__ doesn’t matter!:__nante kankei nai yo!

When someone offers you a choice between two or more things and you do not mind which is chosen, you would be able to say “__なんて関係かんけいないよ!(nante kankei nai yo)” means “__ doesn’t matter!”. And you would also use “そんなの関係かんけいないよ(son’nano kankei nai yo)” means “It doesn’t matter!”.

Learn more: __nante kankei nai yo!

yuka

学歴がくれきなんて関係かんけいないよ (Education doesn’t matte!) (gakureki nante kankei nai yo!)

That’s often the case!:“sore wa yoku aru koto dayo!”

When people often do something and you want to say to someone “That’s not special.”, you would be able to say “それはくあることだよ!(sore wa yoku aru koto dayo)” to comfort.

Learn more: sore wa yoku aru koto dayo!

tatsuya

くあることだよ!がっかりしないで! (That’s often the case! Don’t let it get you down!) (yoku aru koto dayo! gakkari shinai de!)

What do think about__?:__dō omou?

When you want to ask someone about something, you would be able to use “__どうおもう?( omou)” which means “What do think about__?”. Whatever you are curious about, you could put them into ___. The polite way to use it is “__をどうおもいますか?( omoi masuka)”.

Learn more: __dō omou?

yuka

このブーツどうおもう? (What do you think about this boots?) (kono būtsu dō omou?)

Cool!:“ī ne / ī yo”

Discover a new phrase each day to use in your Japanese! What does the expression “いいね!or いいよ!(ī ne / ī yo)” mean? Visit daily to learn some popular Japanese phrases on a regular basis!

Learn more: ī ne / ī yo

yuka

うん!いいね (Sure,that’s cool!) (un! ī ne!)

You’re laid-back !:“ochitsuiteru ne!”

When you meet a person who is relaxed in character, you would be able to say “いてるね!(ochitsuiteru ne)” which means “You’re laid-back!”.

Learn more: ochitsuiteru ne!

tatsuya

いてるね! (You’re laid-back!) (ochitsuiteru ne!)

I wonder if ___:“___kanā?”

When you are talking to yourself and are wondering about something, you would say “___かなぁ?(___kanā?)” which means “I wonder if ___” such as “かれ/彼女かのじょるかなぁ?(I wonder if he/she will come.)”.

Learn more: ___kanā?

tatsuya

かなぁ? (I wonder if she will come.) (kuru kanā?)

Sorry for the wait!:“matasete gomen!”

When your friends wait for you, you would say “たせてごめん!(matasete gomen)” which mean “Sorry for the wait!”. And if you are a girl or a woman, you would “たせてごめんね!(matasete gomen ne)”. In business situations, you won’t be able to use it, you have to say “おたせしてもうわけございません。(omatase shite mōshiwake gozaimasen.)”.

Learn more: matasete gomen!

yuka

たせてごめんね! (Sorry for the wait!) (matasete gomen ne!)

Just wondering!:kiite mita dake!

Someone answered the questions which you asked him/her that you are a little bit curious, you would be able to say “いてみただけ!(kiite mita dake)” means “Just wondering!” such as a supermarket name, the price of something, etc which is not so important. After he/she says “why?(なんで?(nande))”, that would be a chance to use it.

Learn more: kiite mita dake!

tatsuya

いてみただけ (Just wondering!) (我只是问问!) (그냥 물어본거야!) (tôi chỉ hỏi thử thôi!) (kiite mita dake!)

It’s a piece of cake!:“chō kantan!”

When you think of something that is simple to accomplish, you would be able to use “超簡単ちょうかんたん!(chō kantan)” means “It’s a piece of cake!”. “とても簡単かんたんです。(totemo kantan desu)” is pretty formal than it.

Learn more: chō kantan!

yuka

超簡単ちょうかんたん (It’s a piece of cake!) (你明白了吗?) (알았어?) (Bạn đã hiểu chưa?) (chō kantan!)

Way to go!:“yatta ne!”

“やったね!(yatta ne)” is used to tell someone that he or she has done something well which means “Way to go!”. When using “やったね!” to your friends, they would be happy.

Learn more: yatta ne!

tatsuya

やったね (Way to go!) (太好了!) (해냈구나!) (Bạn đã làm rất tốt!) (yatta ne!)

It’s not your business!:“anata ni kankei nai!”

When someone asks you something but you want it to be a secret, you would be able to use “あなたに関係かんけいない!(anata ni kankei nai)” means “It’s not your business!”. If someone is so persistent about it, that would be the chance to use this. Native speakers tend to say “his/her name” instead of using あなた(anata).

Learn more: anata ni kankei nai!

yuka

たつやに関係かんけいないじゃん! (It’s not your business!) (Tatsuya ni kankei nai jan!)

Indecisive:“yūjū fudan”

When a person finds it very difficult to make decisions, you would be able to use “優柔不断ゆじゅうふだん。(yūjū fudan)” means “Indecisive!”. When he/she is indecisive at the restaurants or at the shops, “彼/彼女は優柔不断ゆじゅうふだんです!(kare/kanojo wa yūjū fudan desu)” is often used or even “あなたは/私は優柔不断ゆじゅうふだんです!(You are/I am indecisive!) (anata/watashi wa yūjū fudan desu)”.

Learn more: yūjū fudan

tatsuya

優柔不断ゆじゅうふだんなんだ!わら (I’m indecisive!) (yūjū fudan na’nda! wara)

That’s silly.:“baka dana”

When a person did something silly but funny, you would be able to use “バカだなぁ。(baka dana)” means “That’s silly.” that does not mean it is too strong, like foolish. “バカだなぁ。” is a light word for native speakers, however, if you don’t laugh at him/her while saying this, they feel bad. The point of using it, saying it while laughing.

Learn more: baka dana

yuka

バカだなぁ。くさ (That’s silly. hehe) (baka dana. kusa)

Now you are talking!:“sō kona kutcha!”

When a person showed a good idea or a good plan, especially compared to previous suggestions, you would be able to use “そうこなくっちゃ!( kona kutcha)” which means “Now you are talking!”. “そうこなくっちゃ!” sounds so friendly.

Learn more: sō kona kutcha!

tatsuya

そうこなくっちゃ! (Now you are talking!) (sō kona kutcha!)

Get big-headed!:“unu boreru!”

When a person who becomes arrogant or conceited, you would be able to use “自惚うぬぼれる(unu boreru)” which means “Get big-headed!”. The basic way to use it is “___は自惚うぬぼれる(Someone gets big-headed.)(___wa unu boreru)”.

Learn more: unu boreru!

yuka

正直しょうじき自惚うぬぼれてるよね? (Honestly, she got big-headed, didn’t she?) (shōjiki, unu boreru teru yo ne?)

Yum!:“uma!”

When food tastes very good, you would be able to use “うまっ!(uma)” for especially men which means “Yum!”. For girls/women, “おいしー!(oishi-)” sounds better close to “Yummy!”. Even women could use “おいしー!” between their friends and it sounds friendly.

Learn more: uma!

tatsuya

うまっ! (Yum!) (uma!)

Melty!:“tokeru-!”

When food melts in your mouth, you would be able to use “とけるー!(tokeru-!)” which means “Melty!” such as ice cream, cheese, super tender beef, fatty tuna, etc.

Learn more: tokeru-!

yuka

えー、とけるー! (Wow! Melty!) (e-, tokeru-!)

It was creepy!:“zotto shita!”

When you feel very nervous or frightened, you would be able to use “ぞっとした!(ぞっとした! (zotto shita!)” which means “It was creepy!”. “そうこなくっちゃ!(sō kona kutcha)” sounds so friendly. Talk to your friends about a story of “ぞっとした!”.

Learn more: zotto shita!

tatsuya

ぞっとしたよ!何時頃なんじごろ?どこで? (It was creepy! About what time? Where?) (zotto shita yo! nanji goro? dokode?)

l don’t give a damn!:“dō demo ī!”

When you feel “It doesn’t matter to me”, you would be able to use “どうでもいい!(dō demo ī)” which means “I don’t give a damn!”. If you want to use “I don’t give a damn about ___, you would use”___はどうでもいい(___wa dō demo ī)”. “どうでもいい!” is a casual and quite strong word.

Learn more: dō demo ī!

yuka

どうでもいい! (I don’t give a damn!) (dō demo ī!)

Made it!:“yatta ne/yo!”

When you succeed in doing something, you would be able to use “やったよ!(yatta yo)” which means “Made it!”. “やったよ!” sounds so friendly and positive. “I made it!” is “やったよ!”, “You made it!” is “やったね(yatta ne)”, and “We made it!” is “やったね!”.

Learn more: yatta ne/yo!

tatsuya

やったよ!テストで95点きゅうじゅうごてんとったよ! (I made it! I got a 95 on the test!) (yatta yo! tesuto de kujū goten totta yo!)

Texting while Walking!:“aruki sumaho!”

When he/she who is texting while walking, you would be able to use “かれ/彼女かのじょあるきスマホをしています。(kare/kanojo wa aruki sumaho wo shite imasu)” “Don’t text and walk!” means “あるきスマホするな!(aruki sumaho suru na)” for boys/men and “あるきスマホしないで!(aruki sumaho shinai de)” for girls/women.

Learn more: aruki sumaho!

yuka

あるきスマホあぶないよ! (Texting while walking is dangerous!) (aruki sumaho wa abunai yo!)

I was put off by ___!:“___ni hiku wa!”

When things make you dislike something or someone, you would be able to use “___にくわー!(___ni hiku wa)” which means “I was put off by ___!” or just “くわー!(hiku wa-)” which native speakers prefer. This word is so casual and ordinally has bad meanings, however, “くわー!” is one of the kidding words which sounds friendly and the Japanese tend to use it in-jokes.

Learn more: ___ni hiku wa!

tatsuya

くわー!わら (I was put off by your act!) (hiku wa-! wara)

I had a good time!:tanoshi katta!

When enjoying yourself, you would be able to use “たのしかった!(tanoshi katta)” which means “I had a good time!”. The expression is so natural and popular word.

Learn more: tanoshi katta!

yuka

たのしかったよ! (I had a good time!) (tanoshi katta yo!)

Sorry! I already have plans!:“gomen! sudeni yotei ga haitteru!”

Although your friends ask you out to drink or something, you already have plans. In that case, you would be able to use “ごめん!すでに予定よていはいってる!(gomen! sudeni yotei ga haitteru)” that is casual and which means “Sorry! I already have plans!”. “すいません!すでに予定よていはいっています!(suimasen! sudeni yotei ga haitte masu!)” is formal.

Learn more: gomen! sudeni yotei ga haitteru!

tatsuya

ごめん!すでに予定よていはいってるんだ! (Sorry! I already have plans!) (gomen! sudeni yotei ga haitteru nda!)

What are you up to?:“nani shiteru no?”

It’s just an informal way of asking “なにしてますか?(nani shite masuka)” is “なにしてるの?(nani shiteru no)” and which means “What are you up to?”. Use these words it depends on the people who are your friends or others.

Learn more: nani shiteru no?

yuka

なにしてるの? (What are you up to?) (nani shiteru no?)

Good for you!:“yokatta ne!”

When you show approval for someone’s success, you would be able to use “よかったね!(yokatta ne)” which “Good for you!”. The word “よかったね!” is so friendly word for native speakers. It’s just an informal way of saying “よかったですね!(yokatta desu ne)”.

Learn more: yokatta ne!

tatsuya

よかったね! (Good for you!) (yokatta ne!)

That’s shameful!:“mittomo nai!”

When you think that it is so bad that the person ought to be ashamed, you would be able to use “みっともない!(mittomo nai)” which means “That’s shameful!”. This word is pretty strong and which is a kind of blaming word.

Learn more: mittomo nai!

yuka

みっともなー! (That’s shameful!) (mittomona-!)

I dislike ___ on a biological level!:“___wa seiri teki ni muri!”

When there is no chemistry between you and someone, you would be able to use “___は生理的せいりてき無理むり!(___wa seiri teki ni muri)” which “I dislike ___(person’s name) on a biological level!”. It is a really strong word to blame, so use this when you really dislike someone.

Learn more: ___wa seiri teki ni muri

yuka

ミク生理的せいりてき無理むり (I dislike Miku on a biological level!) (Miku wa seiriteki ni muri!)

I’m a morning/night person!:“asa gata / yoru gata desu!”

If you find it easy to get up in the mornings and it is most awake around this time, you would be able to use “(わたしは)朝型あさがたです!(asa gata / yoru gata desu)”. and If you prefer to stay up late or who functions best during the nighttime hours, you would be able to use “夜型よるがたです!(yoru gata desu)”.

Learn more: asa gata / yoru gata desu!

tatsuya

ううん、朝型あさがただよ! (No, I’m a morning person!) (uun, asa gata dayo!)

May I ask who’s calling?:“dochira sama de shō ka?”

When you answer the phone and want the name of someone calling, you would be able to use “どちらさまでしょうか?(dochira sama de shō ka?)” which means “May I ask who’s calling?”. You could use this phrase, especially in business situations. For your information, “だれですか?(dare desuka?)” means “Who’s calling?” in only casual situations.

Learn more: dochira sama de shō ka?

yuka

こんにちは。どちらさまでしょうか? (Hello. May I ask who’s calling?) (kon’nichiwa. dochira sama de shō ka?)

To be honest___:“shōjiki ni iuto___

When telling someone what you really think, especially when it may be something that they do not want to hear, you would be able to use “正直しょうじきうと___(shōjiki ni iuto)” which means “To be honest___”. Native speakers tend to omit “に” of “正直しょうじきうと___” so that would be “正直しょうじきうと___(shōjiki iuto)”. This is used in casual and business situations as well. And ordinally, we use “正直しょうじきうと___” at the beginning of a sentence.

Learn more: shōjiki ni iuto___

tatsuya

正直しょうじきうときたくないんだー。 (To be honest, I don’t wanna go there.) (shōjiki iuto ikitaku nai nda-.)

Better late than never!:“osoku temo yaranai yori wa mashi!”

When you think that it is better for someone or something to be late than never to do something or to happen, you would be able to use “おそくてもやらないよりはマシ!(osokutemo yaranai yoriwa mashi)” which means “Better late than never!”.

Learn more: osoku temo yaranai yori wa mashi!

yuka

おそくてもやらないよりはマシじゃないの? (Better late than never, right?) (osokute mo yaranai yori wa mashi janai no?)

This soup is thick!:“kono su-pu wa toromi ga aru!”

When the soup is not flowing easily, you would be able to use “このスープはとろみがある!(kono su-pu wa toromi ga aru)” means “This soup is thick!”. It is not only used for the soup, but it is also used for a liquid such as “___はとろみがある!(___wa toromi ga aru)”.

Learn more: kono su-pu wa toromi ga aru!

tatsuya

このトマトジュースはとろみがあるね! (This tomato juice is thick!) (kono tomato jūsu wa toromi ga aru ne!)

avoid ___(people)!:“sakeru!”

When staying away from someone, you would be able to use “(ひとを)ける!(sakeru)” means “Avoid ___(people)”. People who are unpleasant to you.

Learn more: sakeru!

yuka

最近さいきん、ミクがわたしのことけてるがするんだけど・・・ (I feel Miku is recently avoiding me…) (saikin, Miku ga watashino koto saketeru ki ga suru ndakedo…)

Where are you headed?:“doko iku no?”

When you want to know someone goes somewhere, you would be able to use “どこくの?(doko iku no)” which means “Where are you headed?”. The polite way to use it is “どこにくのですか?(doko ni iku no desuka)”.

Learn more: doko iku no?

tatsuya

あ、ゆかー!どこくの? (Hey, Yuka! Where are you headed?) (a, Yuka-! doko iku no?)

Are we allowed to take pictures here?:“kokode shashin wo tottemo ī desu ka?”

When you want to take pictures at the library or somewhere, you would ask people about it and be able to use “ここで写真しゃしんってもいいですか?(kokode shashin wo tottemo ī desu ka)” which means “Are we/Am I allowed to take pictures here?”. Before saying this, you might want to use “すいません(Excuse me/us) (suimasen)”.

Learn more: kokode shashin wo tottemo ī desu ka?

yuka

あっすいません、ここで写真しゃしんってもいいですか? (Excuse me, are we allowed to take pictures here?) (a suimasen, koko de shashin wo totte mo ī desu ka?)

Nowhere near ___!:“___towa kake hanare teru!”

When you feel someone doesn’t look like his/her age, you would be able to use “大人おとなっぽいね!(otona ppoi ne)” means “You look mature for your age!” that is basically a positive meaning.

Learn more: ___towa kake hanare teru!

tatsuya

ありがとう!でも、目標もくひょうとはかけはなれてるけどねー。 (Thanks! But I’m nowhere near my goal though.) (arigatō! demo, mokuhyō towa kake hanare teru kedo ne-.)

I’m dying to ___!:“___shitaku te tamaranai!”

When you REALLY WANNA DO SOMETHING, like “I’m dying to ___!”, you would be able to use “___したくてたまらない!(___shitaku te tamaranai)”. Try to use it in daily conversations to your friends. This phrase has been usually used as casual.

Learn more: ___shitaku te tamaranai!

yuka

マジ!? いたくてたまらないよー! (Are you sure! I’m dying to buy it!) (maji! ? kaitakute tamaranai yo-!)

I was going to ____!:___suru tsumori datta!”

When you want to talk about an event that started in the past and has already ended, you would be able to use “___するつもりだった!(suru tsumori datta)” which means “I was going to ____!”. The polite way to use it is “___するつもりでした!(suru tsumori deshita)”. “___するつもりだった!(suru tsumori datta)” is casual.

Learn more: ___suru tsumori datta!

tatsuya

映画見えいがみにいくつもりだったんだけど風邪引かぜひいたからやめたよ。 (I was going to go to the movies but I decided not to go there because I caught a cold yesterday.) (eiga mi ni iku tsumori dattan dakedo, kaze hīta kara yameta yo.)

I forgive ___!:”___wo yurusu!

When you stop blaming or being angry with someone for something that person has done, you would be able to “___をゆるす!(wo yurusu)” which means “I forgive ___!” and that is casual. The polite way to use it is “___をゆるします!(wo yurushi masu)”. And “I don’t forgive ___” is “___をゆるさない(wo yurusa nai)”.

Learn more: ___wo yurusu!

yuka

もうゆるしたよっ!くさ (I’ve already forgiven him cheating on me!) (yurushita yo! kusa)

How long does it take?:“donokurai jikan ga kakari masu ka?”

When you wonder how long it takes, you would be able to use “どのくらい時間じかんがかかりますか?(donokurai jikan ga kakari masu ka)” which means “How long does it take?”. The casual way to use it is “どのくらい時間じかんかかる?(donokurai jikan ga kakaru)”.

Learn more: donokurai jikan ga kakari masu ka?

tatsuya

ここにきたいのですが、どのくらい時間じかんがかかりますか? (I’d like to go here (on the map), but how long does it take?) (koko ni ni ikitai no desuga, dono kurai jikan ga kakari masu ka?)

I’m screwed!:“yabba-!”

When you feel someone doesn’t look like his/her age, you would be able to use “大人おとなっぽいね!(otona ppoi ne)” means “You look mature for your age!” that is basically a positive meaning.

Learn more: yabba-!

yuka

やっばー!かあさんに電話でんわするのわすれてた! (I’m screwed! I forgot to call mom!) (yabba-! okāsan ni denwa suru no wasurete ta!)

Hit it off!:“iki tōgō suru!”

When two people like each other and become friends as soon as they meet, you would be able to use “意気投合いきとうごうする!(iki tōgō suru)” which means “Hit it off!”. Everybody would be able to use this.

Learn more: iki tōgō suru!

tatsuya

うん!意気投合いきとうごうしたよ!ちょういいやつだったよ! (Yeah! We hit it off! He’s so nice!) (un! ikitōgō shita yo! chō ī yatsu datta yo!)

Tease!:“ijiru!”

When a person to laugh at someone or say unkind things about them because he/she is joking, you would be able to use “いじる!(ijiru)” which means “Tease”. This word is pretty light. Nowadays native speakers don’t use “からかう(karakau)” which is pretty old-fashioned.

Learn more: ijiru!

yuka

いじらないで!くさ (Don’t tease me! hehe) (ijiranai de! kusa)

Make sure___!:“zettai___shite ne!”

When you want someone to take special care to do something, you would be able to use “絶対ぜったい___してね!(zettai___shite ne)” which means “Make sure ___ !”. The polite way to use it is “絶対ぜったい___してください!(Please make sure ___) (zettai___shite kudasai)”.

Learn more: zettai___shite ne!

tatsuya

かえりに牛乳買ぎゅうにゅうかってくるの絶対ぜったいわすれないでね。 (Make sure to buy some milk on your way home.) (kaeri ni gyūnyū katte kuru no zettai wasure naide ne.)

Can you zap it?:“denshi renji de chin shite kureru?”

When you want someone to cook something in a microwave, you would be able to use “電子でんしレンジでチンしてくれる?(denshi renji de chin shite kureru)” which means “Can you zap it?”. The polite way to use it is “電子でんしレンジであたためてくれませんか?(Can you heat it up, please?)(denshi renji de atatamete kure masen ka)”.

Learn more: denshi renji de chin shite kureru?

yuka

電子でんしレンジでチンしてくれる? (Can you zap it?) (denshi renji de chin shite kureru?)

Go for it!:“ganbatte!”

When you encourage someone to increase their efforts to achieve or win something, you would be able to use “頑張がんばって!(ganbatte)” which means “Go for it!”. The polite way to use it is “頑張がんばってください!(ganbatte kudasai)”.

Learn more: ganbatte

tatsuya

頑張がんばってね! (Go for it!) (ganbatte ne!)

Your actions don’t match your words!:“itteru koto to yatteru koto ga chigau!”

When what someone said and what someone did are very different from each other, you would be able to use “ってることとやってることがちがう!(itteru koto to yatteru koto ga chigau)” which means “Your actions don’t match your words!”. The polite way to use it is “ってることとやってることがちがいます!(itteru koto to yatteru koto ga chigai masu)”. The other word is “矛盾むじゅんしています!(mujun shite imasu)”.

Learn more: itteru koto to yatteru koto ga chigau!

yuka

ってることとやってることがちがうじゃん! (Your actions don’t match your words!) (itteru koto to yatteru koto ga chigau jan!)

Stuck in a rut!:“man’neri ka shiteru!”

When you feel job, activity, method, etc are too fixed in one particular type, you would be able to use “マンネリしてる!(man’neri ka shiteru)” which means “Stuck in a rut!”. The polite way to use it is “マンネリしています!(man’neri ka shite masu)”.

Learn more: man’neri ka shiteru!

tatsuya

仕事しごとマンネリしてるかなーって・・・ (I feel like I’m stuck in a rut at work…) (shigoto ga man’nerika shiteru kana- tte…)

Pot Belly!:“pokkori onaka!”

When you want to explain a person who is “a fat and has the round stomach”, you would be able to use “ぽっこりおなか!(pokkori onaka)” which means “Pot Belly”. Everyone would be able to use this. It’s more casual than “ふとってる(fat)(futotteru)”. So, that is not used in a bad way, not in a good way though. Furthermore, “ぽっこり(pokkori)” means “round”.

Learn more: pokkori onaka!

yuka

ぽっこりおなかだね!くさ (You have a pot belly!) (pokkori onaka dane! kusa)

See you later!:“itte rasshai!”

When your family or friends go to school, work, supermarket, etc, you would be able to use “いってらっしゃい!(itte rasshai)” which means “See you later!”. This is used for people who you are close to. Basically, it’s used in the morning.

Learn more: itte rasshai!

tatsuya

いってらっしゃい! (See you later!) (itte rasshai!)

I’ll take a rain check!:“mata no kikai ni suru ne!”

When you tell someone that you cannot accept an invitation now, but would like to do so at a later time, you would be able to use “またの機会きかいにするね!(mata no kikai ni suru ne)” which means “I’ll take a rain check!”. If you are a man, you might want to use “またの機会きかいにするよ!(mata no kikai ni suru yo)”. The polite way to use it is “またの機会きかいにします!(mata no kikai ni shi masu)”.

Learn more: mata no kikai ni suru ne!

yuka

またの機会きかいにするね! (I’ll take a rain check!) (mata no kikai ni suru ne!)

What a relief!:“hotto shita!”

When you feel happy that something unpleasant has not happened or has ended, you would be able to use “ホッとした!(hotto shita)” which means “What a relief!”. The polite way to use it “ホッとしました!(hotto shima shita)”. The same meaning of “ホッとした!” is “安心あんしんした!” which is a little bit more polite than it, however, there is no difference though.

Learn more: hotto shita!

tatsuya

ふー、ホッとした! (Phew! What a relief!) (fu-, hotto shita!)

It is not your fault!:“anatano sei dewa nai!”

When a mistake, especially something for which you are not to blame, you would be able to use “あなたのせいではない!(anatano sei dewa nai)” which means “It is not your fault!”. The polite way to use it is “あなたのせいではないですよ。(anatano sei dewa nai desu yo)”. In daily conversation, native speakers don’t usually say “あなた”, so you might want to say his/her name.

Learn more: anatano sei dewa nai!

yuka

たつやのせいじゃないよ!! (It is not your fault!) (Tatsuya no sei ja nai yo! !)

Overfamiliar!:“narenare shī!”

When you feel someone who you don’t get along is excessively friendly or showing a lack of proper social, you would be able to use “なれなれしい!(narenare shī)” which means “Overfamiliar!”. The polite way to use it is “なれなれしいです!(narenare shī desu)”, however, this is one of the blaming words though.

Learn more: narenare shī

tatsuya

かなりなれなれしいよ。 (That new hire was quite overfamiliar to me.) (kanari narenare shī yo.)

Let me know!:“oshiete!”

When you want someone to inform you, you would be able to use “おしえて!(oshiete)” which means “Let me know”. The polite way to use it is “おしえてください!(oshiete kudasai)”. Basically, you have to say “what you want to know”.

Learn more: oshiete!

yuka

そうなんだ。じゃあ、けるならおしえてね! (Oh really? Okay, well let me know if you can go!) (sō nanda. jā, ikeru nara oshiete ne!)

Oh, that’s too bad.:“a-sore wa zan’nen”

When you feel sympathy about a problem, you would be able to use “あー、それは残念ざんねん!(a-sore wa zan’nen)” which means “Oh, that’s too bad!”. The polite way to use it is “それは残念ざんねんですね。(a-sore wa zan’nen desu ne)”. By saying it, you could show your concern.

Learn more: a-sore wa zan’nen.

tatsuya

あー、それは残念ざんねんだね。 (Oh, that’s too bad.) (a-, sore wa zan’nen dane.)

Are you kidding me?:“uso desho?”

When someone says something surprising or that seems as if it could not be serious or true, you would be able to use “うそでしょ?(uso desho)” which means “Are you kidding me?”. The polite way to use it is “本当ほんとうですか?(hontō desuka)”. “マジ?(maji)” is used as the same meaning “うそでしょ?” and basically “マジ” is used among the younger generation. Everybody can use “うそでしょ?”. Native speakers don’t use “冗談じょうだんでしょ?(jōdan desyo)” lately which also means “うそでしょ?”.

Learn more: uso desho?

yuka

うそでしょ? (What? Are you kidding me, huh?) (uso desho?)

___ is in season now!:___wa ima ga shun desu!”

When the item is the cheapest and the freshest on the market, you would be able to use “___はいましゅんです!(wa ima ga shun desu)” which means “___ is in season now!”. This is the polite way to use it.

Learn more: ___wa ima ga shun desu!

tatsuya

サツマイモいましゅんだよ (Sweet potatoes are in season right now!) (satsumaimo wa ima ga shun dayo!)

I was moved!:“kandō shita!”

When your emotions were strongly affected, you would be able to use “感動かんどうした!(kandō shita)” which means “I was moved!”. The polite way to use it is “感動かんどうしました!(kandō shimasita)”.

Learn more: kandō shita!

yuka

ちょう感動かんどうしたよ。んでみて! (I was so moved! Try to read this!) (chō kandō shita yo. yonde mite!)

He/She is gorgeous!:“kakkoī / kirei desu!”

When you feel he is very cool or she is very beautiful and attractive, you would be able to use “かっこいい/きれいです!(kakkoī / kirei desu)” which means “He/She is gorgeous!”. This is the polite way to use it.

Learn more: kakkoī / kirei desu!

tatsuya

ミクってちょうきれいだよね? (Miku is so gorgeous, isn’t she?) (Miku tte chō kirei dayo ne?)

hang out with ___!:___to asobu!”

When spending time with someone, you would be able to use “___とあそぶ!(to asobu)” which means “Hang out with ___!”. The polite way to use it is “___とあそびます!(to asobi masu)”. Everybody could use this and Native speakers tend to use one.

Learn more: ___to asobu!

yuka

明日あしたミクあそよ! (I’m gonna hang out with Miku tomorrow!) (ashita Miku to asobu yo!)

Be less likely to ___!:“wa/ga suru kanōsei wa hikui!”

When the possibility of something is less than the possibility of another thing, you would be able to use “は/が___する可能性かのうせいひくい!(wa/ga suru kanōsei wa hikui)” which means “Be less likely to ___!”. The polite way to use it is “は/が___する可能性かのうせいひくいです!(wa/ga suru kanōsei wa hikui desu)”. Everybody could use this.

Learn more: wa/ga suru kanōsei wa hikui!

tatsuya

あめ可能性かのうせいひくおもうよ。 (I think it’s less likely to rain.) (ame ga furu kanōsei wa hikui to omou yo.)

I’m excited!:“tenshon agaru!”

When you are very happy and enthusiastic because something good is going to happen, you would be able to use “テンションがる!(tenshon agaru)” which means “I’m excited!”. The polite way to use it is “とてもうれしいです!(tetemo ureshī desu)”. Everybody could use this.

Learn more: tenshon agaru!

yuka

マジ?ちょうテンションがるんだけどっ!くさ (Really? I’m so excited! hehe) (maji? chō tenshon agaru nd akedo! kusa)

I feel dizzy!:“atama ga kurakura suru!”

When you feel as if everything is turning around, and that you are not able to balance and may fall down, you would be able to use “あたまがクラクラする!(atama ga kurakura suru)” which means “I feel dizzy!”. The polite way to use it is “めまいがします!(memai ga shimasu)”. Everybody could use this.

Learn more: atama ga kurakura suru!

tatsuya

あたまがクラクラするよ。 (I feel dizzy.) (atama ga kurakura suru yo.)

Just in case!:“nen no tame!”

When you want to someone or for yourself to protect against something bad that could happen, you would be able to use “ねんのため!(nen no tame)”, which means “Just in case!”. Everybody could use this. Native speakers often omit “に” of “ねんのために!(nen no tame ni)”.

Learn more: nen no tame!

yuka

大丈夫だいじょうぶおもうけど、ねんのためにもう1個買いっこかおうよ! (Probably, but let’s buy one more just in case!) (daijōbu to omou kedo, nen no tame ni mō ikko kaou yo!)

What are you watching?:“nani miteru no?”

When you want to know what someone is watching, you would be able to use “なにてるの?(nani miteru no)” which means “What are you watching/ looking at?”. Everybody could use this. And the polite way to use it is “なにているのですか?(nani wo mite iru no desuka)”. “なにてるの?(What are you watching?)” is used for especially TV or movies and “なにてるの?(What are you looking at?)” is used for everything, it sounds the same though.

Learn more: nani miteru no?

tatsuya

なにてるの? (What are you watching?) (nani mi teru no?)

Ordinary___:“futsū no___。”

When something is not different or special or unexpected in any way, you would be able to use “普通ふつうの___(futsū no)” which means “Ordinary___”. Everybody could use this.

Learn more: futsū no___。

yuka

とくなにもー。普通ふつうだったよ。 (Nothing special. Just another ordinary day.) (tokuni nani mo-. futsū no hi datta yo.)

A terrible singer:“onchi desu。”

When you think someone can’t sing well rather bad, you would be able to use “音痴おんちです!(onchi desu)” which means “A terrible singer!”. Everybody could use this.

Learn more: onchi desu。

tatsuya

音痴おんちだからやだ。わら (I don’t want, cuz I’m a terrible singer. haha) (onchi dakara yada. wara)

Hang around:“burabura suru。”

When you wait or spend time somewhere, usually for no particular reason, you would be able to use “ブラブラする。(burabura suru)” which means “Hang around!”. Everybody could use this. The polite way to use it is “ブラブラしてます。(burabura shimasu)”.

Learn more: burabura suru。

yuka

原宿はらじゅくあたりをぶらぶらしてるから、ひまだったら電話でんわしてよ。 (I’ll be hanging around Harajuku, so call me if you’re free.) (harajuku atari wo burabura shiteru kara, hima dattara denwa shite yo.)

No worries!:“shinpai nai yo!”

When there is no reason to worry about something, you would be able to use “心配しんぱいないよ!(shinpai nai yo)” which means “No worries!”. Everybody could use this. The polite way to use it is “心配しんぱいないですよ。(shinpai nai desu yo) or 心配しんぱいしないでください。(shinpai shinaide kudasai)”.

Learn more: shinpai nai yo!

tatsuya

心配しんぱいないよ! (No worries!) (shinpai nai yo!)

When it comes to ___:“___nara。”

When you identify the specific topic that is being talked about you would be able to use “___なら(nara)”, which means “When it comes to ___”. Everybody could use this. The others are “___のことになると(no koto ni naruto)” or “___にかんして(ni kanshite)” as the meaning of “___なら”. Although you could use “___にかんして”, it would be pretty formal.

Learn more: ___nara。

yuka

日本語にほんご学習がくしゅうなら、アニメがやくつよ! (When it comes to study Japanese, Anime is really helpful!) (Nihongo no gakushū nara, anime ga yakunitatsu yo!)

That’s a rip-off!:“bottakuri da!”

When you feel something that is not worth what you pay for it, you would be able to use “ぼったくりだ!(bottakuri da)” which means “That’s a rip-off!”. “ぼったくりだ!” or “ぼったくりだろ!(bottakuri daro)” are basically used for boys/men and “ぼったくりだよ!(bottakuri dayo)” is used for girls/women. In Tokyo, basically everybody would say “ぼったくりじゃん!(bottakuri jan)”. The polite way to use it is “ぼったくりです!(bottakuri desu)”. The other way to use it is “____はぼったくりだ/です!(___ is/are a rip-off)”.

Learn more: bottakuri da!

tatsuya

ぼったくりだろ!なんだよこのみせ (That’s a rip-off! What the hell is this store!) (bottakuri daro! na’n dayo kono mise!)

She’s pregnant!:“kanojo wa ninshin shite imasu!”

When a woman has a baby or babies developing inside the womb, you would be able to use “彼女かのじょ妊娠にんしんしています!(kanojo wa ninshin shite imasu)” which means “She’s pregnant!”. Everybody could use this. Basically, native speakers don’t use “彼女かのじょは” as the meaning of “She”, so you might want to use “___(someone’s name)さんは” or “specific person”. Furthermore, you would use “妊娠中にんしんちゅう(a noun)” as the meaning of “妊娠にんしんする(a verb)”.

Learn more: kanojo wa ninshin shite imasu!

yuka

ねえちゃん妊娠にんしんしてるの。 (My sister’s pregnant.) (onēchan wa ninshin shi teru no.)

Oh! Look at the time!:“e mō kon’na jikan!”

When you don’t realize the time to go home or do something and totally realized, you would be able to use “えっ、もうこんな時間じかん!(e mō kon’na jikan)” which means “Oh! Look at the time!”. Everybody could use this. Basically, this is used for talking to yourself.

Learn more: e mō kon’na jikan!

tatsuya

うわっ、もうこんな時間じかんじゃん! (Oh! Look at the time!) (uwa, mō kon’na jikan jan!)

I can’t help …ing.:“dōshitemo…shite shimau”

When you are unable to control something or cannot stop yourself from doing something, you would be able to use “どうしても…してしまう。(dōshitemo…shite shimau)” which means “I can’t help …ing.”. Everybody could use this. The polite way to use it is “どうしても…してしまいます。(dōshitemo…shite shimai masu)” or “どうしても…がやめれません。(dōshitemo…ga yamere masen)”.

Learn more: dōshitemo…shite shimau

yuka

うん。でも、どうしてもケーキべちゃうの。くさ (Yeah. But I can’t help eating the cake. hehe) (un. demo, dōshitemo kēki tabe chau no. kusa)

Regret!:“kōkai!”

When someone’s feeling of sadness about something sad or wrong or about a mistake that he/she has made, you would be able to use “後悔こうかいする!(kōkai suru)” which means “Regret!”. Everybody could use this. The polite way to use it is “後悔こうかいします。(kōkai shimasu)”.

Learn more: kōkai!

tatsuya

うん。ずっと日本にほん留学りゅうがくしたいっておもってたから。後悔こうかいしたくないんだ。 (Yeah. Because I’ve wanted to study in Japan for a long time. I don’t want to regret.) (un. zutto nihon ni ryūgaku shitai tte omotte takara. kōkai shitaku nai nda.)

Ohh I see!:“a- naruhodo ne!”

When you understand what someone is telling you., you would be able to use “あー、なるほどね!(a-naruhodo ne)” which means “Ohh I see!!”. It is the word everyone uses in daily conversations as casual. The polite way to use it is “あー、わかりました!(a-wakari mashita)”, “あー、おっしゃるとおりですね!(a-ossharu toori desu ne)”, etc.

Learn more: a- naruhodo ne!

yuka

あー、なるほどね! (Ohh I see!) (a-, naruhodo ne!)

Insensitive___:“mushinkei na___”

When you feel someone is unaware of or unsympathetic to other people’s feelings, you would be able to use “無神経むしんけいな___(mushinkei na___)” which means “insensitive___”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal. The polite way to use it is “無神経むしんけいな___です(mushinkeina___desu)” or “無神経むしんけいです。(mushinkei desu)”.

Learn more: mushinkei na___

tatsuya

マジで?なん無神経むしんけいやつなんだ・・・ (Really? What an insensitive person she is…) (majide? nante mushinkei na yatsu na’nda…)

Fall down:“korobu”

When you fall to the ground, you would be able to use “ころぶ(korobu)” which means “Fall down”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal. The polite way to use it is “ころびます(fall down)(korobi masu)” and “ころびました(fell down)(korobi mashita)”.

Learn more: korobu

yuka

うん。ころんだとき骨折こっせつしちゃった。 (Yeah. I broke a bone when I fell down.) (un. koronda toki ni kossetsu shichatta.)

Close!:“oshī!”

When someone was so close to something, you would be able to use “おしい!(oshī)” which means “Close”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal. The polite way to use it is “おしかったです!(oshi katta desu)” and “あともうすこしでした!(ato mou sukoshi desita)”.

Learn more: oshī!

tatsuya

おしい東京とうきょう (Close! It’s Tokyo!) (oshī! tōkyō!)

What we call ___:iwayuru___

When something is generally referred to by the name that you are about to use, you would be able to use “いわゆる___(iwayuru___)” which means “What we call ___”. Although it is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal, it is a little bit formal.

Learn more: iwayuru___

yuka

いわゆるニートだね。 (He is what we call “NEET”.) (iwayuru nīto dane.)

I feel like a new person!:“umare kawatta kibun!”

When you feel completely refreshed and in good health and spirits, you would be able to use “まれわった気分きぶん!(umare kawatta kibun)” which means “I feel like a new person!”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal. The polite way to use it is “まれわった気分きぶんです!(umare kawatta kibun desu)”.

Learn more: umare kawatta kibun!

tatsuya

まれわった気分きぶん (I feel like a new person!) (umare kawatta kibun!)

as ___ as possible:“dekiru dake___”

When you want to explain that to a feasible extent or to do promptly something, you would be able to use “できるだけ___(dekiru dake)” which means “as ___ as possible”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal. The polite way to use it is “できるだけ___します/するようにします(dekiru dake shimasu / suru youni shimasu)”.

Learn more: dekiru dake___

yuka

できるだけはやてくださいね。 (Please come as soon as possible.) (dekiru dake hayaku kite kudasai ne.)

It’s starting to rain!:“ame ga futte kita!”

When you want to explain that “It’s starting to rain”, you would be able to use “あめってきた!(ame ga futte kita)”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal. The polite way to use it is “あめってきました!(ame ga futte ki mashita)”.

Learn more: ame ga futte kita!

tatsuya

んー。あっ、あめってきたよ! (Well, oh, it’s starting to rain!) (n-. a, ame ga futte kita yo!)

Dirty joke!:“shimo neta!”

When you want to explain that a joke has to do with disgusting acts of sexual innuendo, you would be able to use “しもネタ!(shimo neta)” which means “Dirty joke!”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal. The polite way to use it is “下品げひんはなし(gehin na hanashi)”.

Learn more: shimo neta!

yuka

しもネタきじゃないのっ。 (I don’t like dirty jokes.) (shimo neta wa suki janai no.)

cancel ___ at the last minute!:“___wo dotakyan suru!”

When someone suddenly cancels something, you would be able to use “___をドタキャンする!(___wo dotakyan suru)” which means “cancel ___ at the last minute”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal. The polite way to use it is “___をきゅうにキャンセルします。(___wo kyuu ni kyanseru shimasu)”.

Learn more: ___wo dotakyan suru!

tatsuya

えー?ドタキャンしだよー! (Really? You canceled/cancelled too much at the last minute!) (e-? dotakyan shisugi dayo-!)

All you can eat/drink!:“tabe hōdai / nomi hōdai!”

When you explain that a buffet or restaurant at which you pay a fixed price, no matter how much or how little you eat or drink, you would be able to use “べ/放題ほうだい!(tabe hōdai / nomi hōdai)” which means “All you can eat/drink!”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal.

Learn more: tabe hōdai / nomi hōdai!

yuka

うん!放題ほうだいのおみせこうよ! (Yeah! Let’s go to an All you can drink today!) (un! nomi hōdai no omise ni ikou yo!)

If you say so…:“anata ga sō iu nara…”

When you tentatively accept what someone says or tell you but you are not completely convinced of the truth of the explanation or situation, you would be able to use “あなたがそううなら…(anata ga sou iu nara…)” which means “If you say so…”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal. The polite way to use it is “あなたがそううなら___します(anata ga sou iu nara___shimasu)”. However, basically, native speakers don’t usually say “あなた(anata)”, so you might want to say “his/her name”.

Learn more: anata ga sō iu nara…

tatsuya

そうだね。ゆかがそううのなら・・・ (Right. If you say so…) (sō dane. yuka ga sō iu no nara…)

I can’t thank you enough!:“kansha shite mo shikire masen!”

When you want to be very thankful for people, you would be able to use “感謝かんしゃしてもしきれません!(kansha shite mo shikire masen)” which means “I can’t thank you enough!”. It is pretty formal though. It’s more than “ありがとうございます。(Thank you very much.)”.

Learn more: kansha shite mo shikire masen!

yuka

感謝かんしゃしてもしきれません!ありがとうございます! (I can’t thank you enough! Thank you so much!) (kansha shite mo shikire masen! arigatō gozaimasu!)

Forgetful!:“wasure ppoi!”

When a person often forgets things, you would be able to use “わすれっぽい!(wasure ppoi)” which means “Forgetful”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal. The polite way to use it is “わすれっぽいです。(wasure ppoi desu)”.

Learn more: wasure ppoi!

tatsuya

最近さいきんわすれっぽくて・・わら (I’m forgetful lately… haha) (saikin, wasure ppokute…wara)

Half-baked!:“chūto hanpa!”

When something has not been properly thought out or poorly developed or carried out, you would be able to use “中途半端ちゅうとはんぱ!(chūto hanpa)” which means “Half-baked!”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal. The polite way to use it is “中途半端ちゅうとはんぱです!(chūto hanpa desu)”. You would be able to use “中途半端ちゅうとはんぱな ___(noun) as well”, such as “中途半端ちゅうとはんぱなアイディア(the half-baked idea)”.

Learn more: chūto hanpa!

yuka

んー・・・ちょっと中途半端ちゅうとはんぱじゃない? (Well… I think it’s pretty half-baked, isn’t it?) (n-…chotto chūto hanpa janai?)

Cheers!:“kanpai!”

Just before you drink an alcoholic drink, you would be able to use “乾杯かんぱい!(kanpai)” which means “Cheers!”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal. There are no polite ways. Native speakers tend to say “かんぱーい” instead of “かんぱい”. Say it with them! When jsut saying “乾杯かんぱい“, it sounds pretty cool.

Learn more: kanpai!

tatsuya

かんぱーい! (Cheers!) (kanpa-i!)

I never thought ___!:“___suru towa omottemo nakatta!”

When you never thought about something and which happened, you would be able to use “___するとはおもってもなかった!(___suru towa omottemo nakatta)” which means “I never thought ___!”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal. The polite way to use it is “___するとはおもってもなかったです!(___suru towa omottemo nakatta desu)”. “___するなんておもってもなかった!” is more casual and is often used in daily conversations. And it seems like a person gets more surprised at something than “___するとはおもってもなかった!”.

Learn more: ___suru towa omottemo nakatta!

yuka

あー、たつや!こんなところでたつやにうなんておもってもなかったよ! (Hey Tatsuya! I never thought I’d meet you here!) (a-, Tatsuya! kon’na tokoro de Tatsuya ni au nante omotte mo nakatta yo!)

Bullshit!:“uso tsuku na!”

When you think about what someone is telling you is nonsense or completely untrue, you would be able to use “うそつくな!(uso tsuku na)” which means “Bullshit!”. It is the word everyone uses as casual. The polite way to use it is “うそをつかないでください!(uso tsuka naide kudasai)”. And “うそつくな!” is another word for “でたらめだ!” which is a little bit stronger meaning than “うそつくな!”. Furthermore, “That’s bullshit!” is “そんなのうそだよ!(son’na no uso dayo)” or “そんなのでたらめだよ!(son’na no detarame dayo)”.

Learn more: uso tsuku na!

tatsuya

うそつくなよ! (Bullshit!) (uso tsukuna yo!)

There’s always next time!:“mata tsugi ga aru yo!”

When you want to encourage your friends making mistakes or something, you would be able to use “またつぎがあるよ!(mata tsugi ga aru yo)” which means “There’s always next time!”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal. The polite way to use it is “またつぎがありますよ!(mata tsugi ga arimasu yo)”.

Learn more: mata tsugi ga aru yo!

yuka

まぁまぁ。またつぎがあるよ! (Come on. There’s always next time, you know.) (ma a ma a. mata tsugi ga aru yo!)

___ in a hurry!:“isoide___suru!”

When being in a hurry to do something, you would be able to use “いそいで___する!(isoide___suru)” which means “___ in a hurry!”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal. The polite way to use it is “いそいで___します!(isoide___shimasu)”.

Learn more: isoide___suru!

tatsuya

いそいでいえからね! (Cuz I left home in a hurry!) (isoide ie wo deta kara ne!)

You asked for it!:“jigō jitoku dayo!”

When you think someone deserves the punishment he/she is getting the trouble he/she is in, you would be able to use “自業自得じごうじとくだよ!(jigō jitoku dayo)” which means “You asked for it!”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal. The polite way to use it is “自業自得じごうじとくです!(jigō jitoku desu)”, although it is one of the blaming words.

Learn more: jigō jitoku dayo!

yuka

たつやがほかおんなあるいてるところをたよ。自業自得じごうじとくだよ! (I saw you went out with another girl. You asked for it!) (Tsuya ga hoka no on’nanoko to aruiteru tokoro wo mita yo. jigōjitoku dayo!)

Rather___!:“mushiro___!”

When you used to express an opposite opinion or feeling, you would be able to use “むしろ___!(mushiro___)” which means “You asked for it!”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal including the polite way to use it. “ていうか___!(teiuka___)” is much casual as the meaning of “Rather___” and is used for only your friends or persons who you get along with.

Learn more: mushiro___!

tatsuya

マジ?むしろさむいんだけど・・・ (It is rather chilly today.) (maji? mushiro samui ndakedo…)

Cheer up!:“genki dashite!”

When you want someone to feel happier or more cheerful, you would be able to use “元気げんきだして!(genki dashite)” which means “Cheer up!”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal. The polite way to use it is “元気げんきだしてください!(genki dashite kudasai)”. When someone is down, why don’t you use this phrase?

Learn more: genki dashite!

yuka

焼肉食やきにくたべにこうよ!元気げんきだして! (Let’s go eat Korean barbeque! Cheer up!) (yakiniku tabe ni ikou yo! genki dashite!)

If I were you __:“moshi watashi dattara__”

When you want to give someone advice or put yourself in someone’s situation, you would be able to use “(もし)わたしだったら___(moshi watashi dattara)” which means “If I were you___”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal. The polite way to use it is “(もし)わたしだったら__します(moshi watashi dattara__shimasu)”. Native speakers often omit “もし” in this case.

Learn more: moshi watashi dattara__

tatsuya

そう?もしぼくだったらりたいけどね。 (Are you? If it were me, I’d want to know about it.) (sō? moshi boku dattara shiritai kedo ne.)

You made my day!:“okagede ī ichinichi ni natta yo!”

When you felt happy after talking to someone or who gave a present, you would be able to use “おかげでいい一日いちにちになったよ!(okagede ī ichinichi ni natta yo)” which means “You made my day!” as your gratitude. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal. The polite way to use it is “おかげでいい一日いちにちになりました!(okagede ī ichinichi ni narimashita)”.

Learn more: okagede ī ichinichi ni natta yo!

yuka

ありがとう!かげでいい一日いちにちになったよ! (Thank you! You made my day!) (arigatō! okagede ī ichi ni chi ni natta yo!)

You’re close with ___!:“___to naka ga ī ne!”

When a person gets along with someone, you would be able to use “(あなたは)___となかがいいね!(___to naka ga ī ne)” which means “You’re close with ___”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal. The polite way to use it is “___となかがいいですね!(___to naka ga ī desu ne)”. If you want to say “I’m close with ___!” which would be “(わたしは)___となかがいいです!(___to naka ga ī desu)”.

Learn more: ___to naka ga ī ne!

tatsuya

そうなんだ。ミク本当ほんとうなかがいいね! (I see. You’re very close with your brother.) (sōnanda. Miku to hontōni naka ga ī ne!)

Make a funny face!:“hengao wo suru!”

When a person makes a distorted, silly, or humorous facial expression (at someone), usually for one’s own or someone else’s amusement, you would be able to use “変顔へんがおをする!(hengao wo suru)” which means “Make a funny face!”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal. The polite way to use it is “変顔へんがおをします。(hengao wo shimasu)”.

Learn more: hengao wo suru!

yuka

ははははは!くさ 変顔へんがおやめてよー! (Hahahahaha! Stop making a funny face!) (hahahahaha! kusa hengao yamete yo-!)

___again?:“___dakke?”

When you want to ask someone something which you ask him/her before, you would be able to use “___だっけ?(___dakke)” which means “___again?”. It is the word everyone uses as only casual. The polite way to use it is “___でしたでしょうか?(___deshita de shouka)”.

Learn more: ___dakke?

tatsuya

いくらだっけ? (How much is it again?) (ikura dakke?)

That was close!:“abuna katta!”

When you almost caused a traffic accident, you would be able to use “あぶなかった!(abuna katta)” which means “That was close!”. It is the word everyone uses as both casual and formal. The polite way to use it is “あぶなかったです。(abuna katta desu)”.

Learn more: abuna katta!

yuka

ふー。あぶなかったー! (Phew! That was close!) (fu-. abuna katta-!)

Cuz ___:“datte___ / ___kara”

When you want to explain the reason, you would be able to use “だって___ / ___から(datte___ / ___kara)” which means “Cuz___”. It is the word especially girls/women uses as only casual. The polite way to use it is “___ なので(nanode)”, “___ですので(___desu node)”. And everybody could say “___ だから(___dakara)”, “___から(___kara)” as casual.

Learn more: datte___ / ___kara

tatsuya

風邪引かぜひいたからね。 (Cuz I have a cold.) (kaze hīta kara ne.)

You have good taste!:“sensu ī ne!”

When you want to praise someone’s sense, you would be able to use “センスいいね!(sensu ī ne)” which means “You have good taste!”. Everybody uses as only casual. You could also say “センスいいね!(sensu ī ne)”, however, native speakers tend to omit “が” of “センスいいね!” when they are pretty excited. So when you say “センスいいね!(sensu ī ne)” may sound a little bit cool. The polite way to use it is “センスがいいですね!(sensu ga ī desu ne)”.

Learn more: sensu ī ne!

yuka

超似合ちょうにあってるよ!センスいいね! (That really suits you! You have good taste!) (chō niatteru yo! sensu ī ne!)

Peel ___!:“___no kawa wo muku!”

When you want to explain to remove the skin of fruit and vegetables, you would be able to use “___のかわをむく!(___no kawa wo muku)” which means “Peel ___!”. Everybody could use this as both casual and business situations. The polite way to use it is “___のかわをむきます。(___no kawa wo muki masu)”.

Learn more: ___no kawa wo muku!

tatsuya

じゃあ、ぼくはじゃがいもかわをむくよ。 (Then, I’ll peel the potatoes.) (jā, boku wa jagaimo no kawa wo muku yo.)

Don’t be silly!:“fuzakeru na!”

When someone is being silly and you want to tell him/her not to be silly, you would be able to use “ふざけるな!(fuzakeru na)” which means “Don’t be silly!”. “ふざけるな!(fuzakeru na)” or “ふざけるなよ!(fuzakeru na yo)” is used for especially boys/men, so if you are a girl or a woman, it would “ふざけないで!(fuzake nai de)” or “ふざけないでよ!(fuzake nai deyo)” sounds girls/women. Furthermore, “ふざけるな!” sounds pretty stronger than “ふざけるなよ!(fuzakeru na yo)”. The polite way to use “ふざけるな!” for boys/men or “ふざけないで!” for girls/women is “ふざけないでください!(fuzake nai de kudasai)” The tip for using them is how you say these.

Learn more: fuzakeru na!

yuka

ちょっと〜、ふざけないでよ! (Hey, don’t be silly!) (chotto~, fuzake nai de yo!)

Give me a hint!:“hinto kudasai!”

When you want to get a small piece of information that helps you to guess something from someone, you would be able to use “ヒントください!(hinto kudasai)” which means “Give me a hint!”. Everybody could use this phrase as casual. The polite way to use it is “ヒントをいただけませんか?(hinto wo itadake masenka)”.

Learn more: hinto kudasai!

tatsuya

首都しゅと?うーん・・・ヒントください! (Capital city? Well… Give me a hint!) (shuto? u-n hinto kudasai!)

Do you have any tips?:“kotsutte arimasu ka?”

When you want to get a useful piece of information to be successful or achieve something, you would be able to use “コツってありますか?(kotsutte arimasu ka)” which means “Do you have any tips?”. Everybody could use this phrase as casual. The polite way to use it is “コツはありますか?(kotsu wa arimasu ka)” or “コツをおしえていただけませんか?(kotsu wo oshiete itadake masen ka)”.

Learn more: kotsutte arimasu ka?

yuka

うーん。コツってありますか? (Well… Do you have any tips?) (u-n. kotsu tte arimasu ka?)

I’ll think about it!:“kangae te oku yo!”

When you didn’t answer right away and want to think what someone said, you would be able to use “かんがえておくよ!(kangae te oku yo)” and which means “I’ll think about it!”. Everybody could use this phrase in daily conversations. The polite way to use it is “かんがええておきます。(kangae te oki masu)” in business situations.

Learn more: kangae te oku yo!

tatsuya

金曜日きんようびはちょっといそしいけど、かんがえておくよ (I’m a little busy this Friday but I’ll think about it.) (kin’yōbi wa chotto isogashī kedo, kangaete oku yo.)

You’ll see!:“sono uchi wakaru yo!”

When a person does not agree with you about what you think will happen in the future, and you believe that you will be proved right, you would be able to use “そのうちかるよ!(sono uchi wakaru yo)” and which means “You’ll see!” Everybody could use this phrase in daily conversations. The polite way to use it is “そのうちかりますよ。(sono uchi wakari masu yo)”.

Learn more: sono uchi wakaru yo!

yuka

そのうちかるよ! (You’ll see!) (sono uchi wakaru yo!)

Have you ever ___?:“___shitakoto wa arimasu ka?”

When you want to ask a person who did something, or went somewhere specifically in the past, you would be able to use “___したことはありますか?(shitakoto wa arimasu ka)” which means “Have you ever ___?”. Everybody could use this phrase in both daily conversations and business situations.

Learn more: ___shitakoto wa arimasu ka?

tatsuya

このほんんだことある? (Have you ever read this book?) (kono hon yonda koto aru?)

Wet blanket!:“shikeru / shirakeru!”

When you want to explain that someone who ruins other people’s good times., you would be able to use “しける/しらける!(shikeru / shirakeru)” which means “Wet blanket!”. Everybody could use this phrase in both daily conversations and business situations. Furthermore, “しける” and “しらける” are the same meaning, however, basically “しける” has been used in Osaka and “しらける” has been in Tokyo.

Learn more: shikeru / shirakeru!

yuka

レイってしけてるよね? (Rei’s such a wet blanket, isn’t he?) (Rei tte shiketeru yone?)

I’ll be with you in a moment.:“shōshō omachi kudasai”

When you want to tell someone that you will do something very soon, you would be able to use “少々しょうしょうちください。(shōshō omachi kudasai)” which means “I’ll be with you in a moment.”. Everybody could use this phrase in business situations. You would say “ちょっとって!(chotto matte)” in daily conversations as casual.

Learn more: shōshō omachi kudasai

tatsuya

少々しょうしょうちください。 (I’ll be with you in a moment.) (shōshō omachi kudasai.)

What do you want for dinner?:“yūshoku wa nani ga ī?”

When you want to ask a person what he/she wants to eat for dinner, you would be able to use “夕食ゆうしょくなにがいい?(yūshoku wa nani ga ī)” which means “What do you want for dinner?”. Everybody could use this phrase in both daily conversations. The polite way to use it is “夕食ゆうしょくなにがいいですか?(What would you like for dinner?) (yūshoku wa nani ga ī desuka)” used in business situations as well. Native speakers sometimes omit “は” of “夕食ゆうしょくなにがいい?(yūshoku wa nani ga ī)”, so that would be “夕食ゆうしょくなにがいい?(yūshoku wa nani ga ī)”.

Learn more: yūshoku wa nani ga ī?

yuka

夕食ゆうしょくなにがいい? (What do you want for dinner?) (yūshoku nani ga ī?)

I’m hungry!:“onaka suita!”

When you are hungry, you would be able to use “おなかすいた!(onaka suita)” which means “I’m hungry!”. Everybody could use this phrase in both daily conversations. The polite way to use it is “おなかがすきました。(onaka ga suki mashita)”. Furthermore, “I’m getting hungry!” is “おなかがすいてきた!(onaka ga suite kita)”.

Learn more: onaka suita!

tatsuya

腹空なかすいたー! (I’m hungry!) (onaka suita-!)

It’s not my thing.:“tokui janai。”

When you want to explain what you don’t like to do, what you’re not good at doing, you would be able to use “得意とくいじゃない。(tokui janai)” which means “It’s not my thing.”. Everybody could use this phrase in both daily conversations as casual. The polite way to use it is “得意とくいではありません。(tokui dewa arima sen)”.

Learn more: tokui janai。

yuka

料理りょうり得意とくいじゃないんだー。 (Cooking isn’t my thing.) (ryōri wa tokui janai nda-.)

I feel you.:“wakaru yo。”

When you want to show empathy or agree with the person, you would be able to use “かるよ!(wakaru yo)” which means “I feel you!”. Everybody could use this phrase in daily conversations. The polite way to use it is “その気持きもかります。(sono kimochi wakaru yo)”.

Learn more: wakaru yo。

tatsuya

かるよ。おれ不安ふあんだよ。 (I feel you, man. It’s freaking me out too.) (wakaru yo. ore mo fuan dayo.)

New products!:“shin shouhin!”

When you want to explain about a newly released product, you would be able to use “新商品しんしょうひん!(shin shouhin)” which means “New products! or A new product!”. Everybody could use this phrase both in daily conversations and business situations.

Learn more: shin shouhin!

yuka

新商品しんしょうひんよわくて・・・くさ (I can’t resist new products… hehe) (shinshōhin ni yowakute…kusa)

Can’t read between the lines!:“kūki ga yome nai!”

When a person doesn’t understand someone’s real feelings or intentions from what they say, you would be able to use “___は空気くうきめない!(___kūki ga yome nai)” which means “___ can’t read between the lines!”. Everybody could use this phrase in daily conversations. The polite way to use it is “___は空気くうきめません。(___kūki ga yome masen)” or “___は理解出来りかいできていません。(___wa rikai dekite imasen)” Furthermore, native speakers often omit “が” of “空気くうきめない(kūki ga yome nai)”, so that would be “空気くうきめない”. Lastly, “空気くうきむ(kūki wo yomu)” means “to read between the lines.”

Learn more: kūki ga yome nai!

tatsuya

ミクって空気くうきめないよね?わら (Miku can’t read between the lines, right?) (Miku tte kūki yomenai yone? wara)

I should’ve ___!:“___sureba yokatta!”

When you regret something, you would be able to use “___すればよかった!(___sureba yokatta)” which means “I should’ve ___!”. Everybody could use this phrase in daily conversations. The polite way to use it is “___すればよかったです。(___sureba yokatta desu)”. Furthermore, “I shouldn’t have ___” means “___しなければよかった!(___shinakereba yokatta)”.

Learn more: ___sureba yokatta!

yuka

ちちゃったー・・・・もっと勉強べんきょうしておけばよかった! (I faild…I should have studied harder!) (ochi chatta-…motto benkyō shite okeba yokatta!)

I have the same opinion!:“onaji iken desu!”

When you have the same opinion with someone, you would be able to use “おな意見いけんです!(onaji iken desu)” means “I have the same opinion!” and which “おな意見いけんです!” sounds a little bit formal. You would also say “そうだね(Right.)” more casual. However, For your information, “I have the same opinion with ___!” would be “___とおな意見いけんです!” such as “あなたとおな意見いけんです!(“I have the same opinion with you!”)”.

Learn more: onaji iken desu!

tatsuya

おな意見いけんです! (I have the same opinion!) (onaji iken desu!)

Are you in a hurry?:“isoide masu ka?”

When you want to ask if a person is in a hurry or not, you would be able to use “いそいでますか?(isoide masu ka)” which means “Are you in a hurry?”. Everybody could use this phrase in daily conversations as casual. The more casual way to use it is “いそいでる?(isoideru)”. The polite way to use it is “おいそぎですか?(o isogi desu ka)” and which is used as formal.

Learn more: isoide masu ka?

yuka

いいですよ。あっ、いそいでますか? (That’s ok. Well, are you in a hurry?) (ī desu yo. a, isoide masu ka?)

I’m glad to hear that!:“sore wa yokatta!”

When you want to express pleasure at what the speaker has just said, you would be able to use “それはかった!(sore wa yokatta)” which means “I’m glad to hear that!”. Everybody could use this phrase in daily conversations as casual. The polite way to use it is “それはかったです。(sore wa yokatta desu)” and which is also used in business situations as formal. Furthermore, native speakers often omit “それは” of “それはかった!” so that would be “かった!”.

Learn more: sore wa yokatta!

tatsuya

かったー! (I’m glad to hear that!) (yokatta-!)

Call me anytime!:“itsudemo denwa shite!”

When you would welcome someone’s call at any time, you would be able to use “いつでも電話でんわして!(itsudemo denwa shite)” which means “Call me anytime!”. Everybody could use this phrase in daily conversations. The polite way to use it is “いつでも電話でんわしてください!(itsudemo denwa shite kudasai)”.

Learn more: itsudemo denwa shite!

yuka

いつでも電話でんわしてね! (Call me anytime!) (itsudemo denwa shite ne!)

What a surprise!:“bikkuri shita-!”

When you got surprised, you would be able to use “びっくりしたー!(bikkuri shita-)” which means “What a surprise!”. Everybody could use this phrase in daily conversations as casual. The polite way to use it is “びっくりしたしました!(bikkuri shimashita)” and which is also used in business situations as formal.

Learn more: bikkuri shita-!

tatsuya

びっくりしたー!ありがとう! (What a nice surprise! Thank you!) (bikkuri shita-! arigatō!)

I don’t get the point!:“pin to konai!”

When you don’t figure something out if it is great or not, you would be able to use “ピンとこない!(pin to konai)” which means “I don’t get the point!”. Everybody could use this phrase in daily conversations as casual. The polite way to use it is “ピンときません!(pin to kimasen)” and “かりません。(wakari masen)” is used in business situations as formal.

Learn more: pin to konai!

yuka

ピンとこないんだけど! (I don’t get the point though!) (pin to konai n dakedo!)

If anything___:“dochira kato iu to___”

When you want to introduce something which strengthens or changes the meaning of the statement you have just made but only in a small or unimportant way, you would be able to use “どちらかというと___(dochira kato iu to___)” which means “If anything…”. Everybody could use this phrase both in daily conversations as casual and in business situations as formal. The polite way to use it is “どちらかというと___です(dochira kato iu to___desu)”.

Learn more: dochira kato iu to___

tatsuya

どちらかというと、この帽子ぼうしがいいです。 (If anything, I’d like this one, please.) (dochira kato iu to, kono bōshi ga ī desu.)

It slipped my mind!:“do wasure suru!”

When you completely forget something, you would be able to use “どわすれする!(do wasure suru)” which means “It slipped my mind!”. Everybody could use this phrase both in daily conversations as casual and in business situations as formal. The polite way to use it is “どわすれしました(します)(do wasure shimashita(shimasu))!(do wasure shimashita)”. Or you could use “完全かんぜんわすれてました(てます)!(kanzen ni wasurete mashita(masu))”.

Learn more: do wasure suru!

yuka

だね。あっ、名前なまえなんだっけ?わすれしちゃった。 (Yeah. Well, what was his name? His name has completely slipped my mind.) (dane. a, namae na’ndakke? do wasure shi chatta.)

It’s not my business!:“watashi niwa kankei nai!”

When you want to say something that does not pertain to you, you would be able to use “わたしには関係かんけいない!(watashi niwa kankei nai)” which means “It’s not my business!”. Everybody could use this phrase both in daily conversations as casual. The polite way to use it is “わたしには関係かんけいありません!(watashi niwa kankei arimasen)” which is also used in business situations as formal.

Learn more: watashi niwa kankei nai!

tatsuya

ぼくには関係かんけいありません。 (What? It’s not my business.) (boku niwa kankei ari masen.)

With any luck ___:“un ga yokere ba___”

When you want to explain “If you/we are lucky”, you would be able to use “うんければ___(un ga yokere ba___)” which means “With any luck ___”. Everybody could use this phrase both in daily conversations as casual and in business situations as formal. The polite way to use it is also the same. Furthermore, “うんかったら___(un ga yokattara___)” sounds a little casual than “うんければ___”.

Learn more: un ga yokere ba___

yuka

そうだね。うんかったら、にじえるよ。 (Yeah. With any luck, you’ll see a rainbow.) (sōda ne. un ga yokattara, niji ga mieru yo.)

It could happen to anyone.:“dare ni okite mo okashiku nai”

When you heard some uncontrollable event that impacts people, you would be able to use “だれきてもおかしくない。(dare ni okite mo okashiku nai)” which means “It could happen to anyone.”. Everybody could use this phrase both in daily conversations as casual. The polite way to use it is “だれきてもおかしくありません。(dare ni okite mo okashiku arimasen)” and which is used in business situations as formal.

Learn more: dare ni okite mo okashiku nai

tatsuya

そうですね。だれきてもおかしくないですよね。 (I know. It could happen to anybody.) (sō desu ne. dare ni okite mo okashiku nai desu yone.)

Something is wrong.:“nanka hen da”

When you feel something is not suitable or correct, you would be able to use “なんへんだ。(nanka hen da)” which means “Something is wrong.”. Everybody could use this phrase both in daily conversations as casual. The polite way to use it is “なんへんです。(nanka hen desu)”. “なにかおかしいです。(nanka okashii desu)” is used in business situations as formal.

Learn more: nanka hen da

yuka

うーん。なんへんだよ。 (Well, something is wrong.) (u-n. nanka hen dayo.)

Make an excuse!:“iiwake wo suru!”

When a person who gives a reason for doing something he/she shouldn’t do, or for not doing something he/she should do, you would be able to use “わけをする!(iiwake wo suru)” which means “Make an excuse!”. Everybody could use this phrase in daily conversations as casual. The polite way to use it is “わけをします。(iiwake wo shimasu)” and which is also used in business situations as formal. Furthermore, native speakers often omit “を” of “わけをする”, so that would be “わけする”. Lastly, “わけ” is “excuse” and which is a noun.

Learn more: iiwake wo suru!

tatsuya

わけしてるよね?ダイエットちゅうじゃなかったの? (You’re making an excuse, huh? You’re on a diet, right?) (iiwake shiteru yone? daietto chū ja nakatta no?)

That would be great.:“sō shite moraeru to tasukari masu”

When a person who would help you such as moving something over there, picking you up somewhere, etc, you would be able to use “そうしてもらえると、たすかります。(sō shite moraeru to tasukari masu)” which means “That would be great/helpful.”. Everybody could use this phrase both in daily conversations as casual and in business situations as formal. If you want to use it more casual, you would say “そうしてもらえると、たすかるよ。(sō shitemoraeru to tasukaru yo)”.

Learn more: sō shite moraeru to tasukari masu

yuka

そうしてもらえると、たすかります。ありがとうございます! (That would be great, thank you!) (sō shite moraeru to, tasukari masu. arigatō gozaimasu!)

In the mood for/to ___:“___shitai kibun”

When you feel like doing or having something, you would be able to use “___したい気分きぶん。(___shitai kibun)” which means “in the mood for/to ___”. Everybody could use this phrase in daily conversations as casual. The polite way to use it is “___したい気分きぶんです。(___shitai kibun desu)” and which is also used in business situations as formal.

Learn more: ___shitai kibun

tatsuya

なにべたい気分きぶん (What are you in the mood for tonight?) (nani tabetai kibun?)

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