4 Phrases! Introduce Yourself In Japanese! You Should Know

how-to-introduce-your-self-in-japanese-jpyokoso

Once you’ve mastered those five, you are not a beginner anymore.

As we reach the end of this article, we hope that you were able to learn all the basic self-introduction lines that you can use at school, work, online, or for casual interactions.

Let’s go 5 phrases for “Introduce Yourself In Japanese”.

TOC

1. Nice to meet you!

hazimemashite

The very first word you will need to start your self-introduction with is “はじめまして (Nice to meet you)”.

“Hajimemashite” is a conjugation of “hajimeru,” which is a verb meaning “to begin”.
It literally means “I am meeting you for the first time”.

Saying “はじめまして” is considered polite upon meeting someone for the first time and will help you leave a good impression.

It’s the same Japanese phrase you’ll use if you want to say to someone “Nice to meet you”.

tatsuya

Nice to meet you, everyone! (みなさん、はじめまして! minasan, hajimemashite!)

Example

はじめまして。わたし名前なまえはトムです。

Nice to meet you. My name is Tom.
hajimemashite. watashi wa Tom desu.

2. My name is ◯◯.

watashino namaewa ◯◯ desu

Whether you are a student, tourist, or a new employee, learning how to introduce yourself in Japanese is most important.

The most common and simple way to introduce yourself in Japanese is the phrase 

“Watashi no namae wa _ desu.”

It means “My name is _.”

  • わたしの (watashi no) is the Japanese counterpart of “My”.
  • なまえ (namae) means “name” in Japanese.
  • わ(wa) is “is”.

so, this makes わたしのなまえわ(watashi no namae wa) means “My name is”.

JapaneseEnglishRomanization
わたし名前なまえは___です。___とんでください。My name is ___. Please call me ___.watashino namae wa___desu. ___to yonde kudasai.

My name is Catherine. Please call me Cate. (わたし名前なまえキャサリンです。ケイトんでください。watashino namae wa Kyasarin desu. Keito to yonde kudasai.)

Bear in mind that Japanese people rarely use “watashi” in conversation. When introducing yourself, you can omit the “watashi wa” if you’re comfortable trying to sound like a native.

You can’t omit “です(desu)”. Because “です(desu)” at the end of a sentence signifies politeness.

Also, when you’re asked “What is your name?”, you can answer with this phrase.

If you change after “hajimemashite” , then it will be casual or polite.

DAISUKE

You can use it with “hajimemashite“.

Example

Casual


はじめまして。トムです。
Nice to meet you. I’m Tom.
hajimemashite. Tom desu.

Polite

はじめまして。わたし名前なまえはトムです。
Nice to meet you. My name is Tom.
hajimemashite. watashino namae wa Tom desu.

Very Formal

はじめまして。トムともうします。
Nice to meet you. My name is Tom.
hajimemashite.Tom to mōshimasu.

Very Formal/Business

はじめまして。Yokosoのトムともうします。

Nice to meet you. My name is Tom from Yokoso.
hajimemashite. Yokoso no Tomu to mōshimasu.

3. I am from ◯◯.

◯◯ shusshin desu

Aside from stating your name, it is totally normal if people will ask where you are from or your nationality.

shusshin is a noun word which means “come from” or “a place of one’s origin.”
If you’re a foreign person in Japan, state your country.

How to use

わたし___出身しゅっしんです。I am from ___.

If where you were born and where you currently live are different places, you can describe where you are living at the moment.

でもいまは___にんでいます。But currently I am living in ___.

This is the example of combined them;

わたしはニューヨーク出身しゅっしんです。でもいまはマサチューセッツしゅうんでいます。I am from New York, but currently I am living in Massachusetts.

Some people use ◯◯ kara kimashita which is not that bad. But it sounds “foreigners”. So using “◯◯ shusshin desu” is native-ish.

You can use them as polite and formal.

Very Formal/Business

◯◯ kara mairimasita

アメリカからまいりました。
I’m from America.
Amerika kara mairimashita.

EXAMPLE

Casual

Cate

I’m from America. (アメリカ出身しゅっしんよ。 Amerika shusshin yo.)

Polite

Bob

I’m from America. (アメリカ出身しゅっしんです。 Amerika shusshin desu.)

Very Formal/Business

DAISUKE

I’m from Japan. (日本にほんからまいりました。 Nihon kara mairimashita.)

4. Please be kind to me.

yoroshiku onegai shimasu

While you can always just end with thank you in the Japanese language, you can also say “Yoroshiku onegaishimasu,” to end your initial introduction.

The phrase よろしくおねがいします (Yoroshiku Onegaishimasu) formally ends your Japanese self-introduction.

This may sound awkward in English, but it’s an important greeting phrase in Japan to show your gratitude and humbleness.

Some Japanese learners put “どうぞ” before “よろしくおねがいします”, but it sounds old-fashioned. So, if you’re under 60, don’t put it.

EXAMPLE

Casual

よろしく(for men) / よろしくね (for women)。

Please be kind to me.

Cate

Please be kind to me. (よろしくね。 yoroshikune.)

Bob

Please be kind to me! (よろしく! yoroshiku!)

Polite

よろしくお 願いねが します。

Please be kind to me.

DAISUKE

I usually use “よろしくおねがいします” in 90% of situations.

Polite/Business

よろしくお 願いねが  致しますいた   

Please be kind to me.

yuka

Please be kind to me. (よろしくお 願いねが  致しますいた   。yoroshiku onegai itashimasu)

When a person with a suit meets someone in the business in person.

Formal/Business

よろしくお 願いねが  申し上げますもう あ   

Please be kind to me.

tatsuya

You can use this, but it sounds like “business e-mail”.

Review

1. Nice to meet you!
hazimemashite

2. My name is ◯◯
watashino namaewa ◯◯ desu

3. I am from ◯◯.
◯◯ shusshin desu

4. Please be kind to me.
yoroshiku onegai shimasu

DAISUKE

Try to use these phrases to Native Japanese teachers with italki once not to forget these you’ve just remembered now!

\ Learn Japanese with a personal native teacher!/

Let's share this post !

Comments

To comment

TOC
閉じる